BRUNEL UNIVERSITY LONDON

Children, Youth and International Development

M.A  |  Placement Year:   No

The Children, Youth and International Development MA will equip you with the conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge to critically evaluate policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.

The core modules focus on key issues relating to children, youth and international development, including the rights and participation of young people. They also prepare students in research design and practice. The optional modules offer a unique opportunity to appreciate in depth how children and youth-related issues are addressed from alternative disciplinary perspectives.

This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development.  It employs innovative teaching and assessment methods and offers students the opportunity to engage in placement learning or an Erasmus exchange with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. Students can undertake a sustained project with an external organisation as part of a placement module. This may be an organisation with which they already have links, such as a current of former employer. They may also choose to apply their 60 credit dissertation to the needs of an identified community or organisation.

Programme description

The Children, Youth and International Development MA will equip you with the conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge to critically evaluate policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.

The core modules focus on key issues relating to children, youth and international development, including the rights and participation of young people. They also prepare students in research design and practice. The optional modules offer a unique opportunity to appreciate in depth how children and youth-related issues are addressed from alternative disciplinary perspectives.

This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development.  It employs innovative teaching and assessment methods and offers students the opportunity to engage in placement learning or an Erasmus exchange with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. Students can undertake a sustained project with an external organisation as part of a placement module. This may be an organisation with which they already have links, such as a current of former employer. They may also choose to apply their 60 credit dissertation to the needs of an identified community or organisation.

Key Modules

Students from the programme have progressed to a variety of careers in different types of organisations, primarily in international development NGOs or in government ministries and agencies in countries in the global south. A number have pursued PhDs following completion of the MA. Here are a few examples:

National / International NGOs

  • AbleChildAfrica
  • ADRA
  • Anti-Slavery International
  • Community Development Foundation
  • Fairtrade Foundation
  • Feed the Children
  • Operation Mobilisation
  • Restless Development
  • Save the Children
  • SOS Children’s Villages.

Government ministries / agencies

  • Ministry of Gender, Youth and Child Development, Trinidad and Tobago
  • British Council

International organisations

  • Commonwealth Secretariat (Youth Affairs).

Education and youth work

  • Social worker in Mexico
  • Teachers in India and Zambia
  • Youth work in the UK and elsewhere.

Research

  • PhD Studentship at University of Reading (Geographies of Care, Disability and Family Relationships in Sub-Saharan Africa)
  • PhDs at Liverpool John Moores University and University of Manchester
  • Consultation with Overseas Development Institute
Module & Subject
  • Critical Perspectives on International Development

Indicative topics of study: Introduction to international development; anthropology and the colonial encounter; anthropology as critical political economy: questioning policy, practices and perceptions of international development; development and the nation-state; development and indigenous knowledge; education and development; poverty alleviation and development; gender and development; anthropological perspectives on the environment; hidden livelihoods: economic analysis and the informal economy; ‘compromising only to be compromised’: applied ethnography and participatory research; international development and human rights.

  • Understanding Childhood and Youth

Indicative topics of study: Concepts of childhood and youth and their diversity across time and space; academic/theoretical approaches toward childhood and youth; intergenerational relations: families and social reproduction; the ‘ideal’ child and play; child labour/work; children’s rights; vulnerability and resilience; youth transitions; youth culture and globalisation; young people’s participation; young people, violence and class; youth migration and urbanisation.

  • Researching Children, Childhood and Youth

Indicative topics of study: the nature and philosophical foundations of social research; politics and ethics of social research, including considerations for cross-cultural research; special considerations for researching with children (including ethical issues); designing a research strategy for academic and policy research; designing monitoring and evaluation of projects; researching with/ in organisations; data collection (secondary data sources, fieldwork, collecting quantitative data, collecting qualitative data, visual methods, PAR etc); data analysis (quantitative and qualitative, discourse analysis, policy analysis, programme evaluation); communicating research – writing up and other dissemination strategies.

  • Dissertation

The choice of the topic for the research project is suggested by the individual student, but is subject to the formal agreement of the module leader. In general the topic is likely to be developed from substantive material covered elsewhere in the programme, and related to individual interest, experience and opportunities. The dissertation is usually developed from the research proposal produced in the research methods module, in discussion with a member of staff – the project supervisor.

Optional

(Please note, not all options are available every year and some have capped intakes.)

  • Sociology of Youth and Youth Work

Main topics of study: the study of the social world; society and social processes; the sociology of youth; deviance, control, crime and young people; sociology, youth work and the youth service; young people in non-western cultures.

  • Contemporary Issues in Youth and Community Work

Main topics of study: education and lifelong learning: roles for youth work; dimensions of social cohesion: class, race, gender and disability in youth and community work; the significance of community and community work; listening to young people’s voices; youth work, citizenship and society.

  • Social Policy

Main topics of study: youth work, youth service and contemporary social policy; the welfare state, youth work and youth service in the 21st century; young people's position in neoliberal societies; youth service in the welfare state; consensus and conflict in welfare policy; local and national services and NGOS.

  • Anthropology of Education and Learning

Main topics of study: education and learning: culture and cognition; learning and embodiment; education, learning and apprenticeship; learning, language and knowledge; learning, identity and social difference; learning and social memory

  • Anthropological Perspectives on War and Humanitarianism

Main topics of study: contemporary warfare and complex emergencies; humanitarian responses to contemporary warfare; origins of humanitarianism: from the founding of the Red Cross to Médecins Sans Frontières; war and ethnic violence; war, famine and scarcity; refugees and mass forced displacement; international criminal justice and humanitarian assistance; re-building war-torn societies. Ethnographic case studies from East Africa, West Africa, South America, Eastern Europe and the Middle East will be used to engage with these topics.

  • Psychological Development

Main topics of study: models and theories of development of children and young people; a critique of developmental norms, and of universalism; criticisms of the psychological gaze; a critique of developmentalism as applied to nations or individuals.

  • Applied Learning for Children, Youth and International Development (placement option)

Students opting for this module will undertake a short placement (a day a week for ten weeks) with an organisation that works in the field of children, youth and international development. Through the placement, a series of workshops and coursework assignments they will examine the relevance and responsibility of their academic studies to community, voluntary action and paid work, as well as having the opportunity to develop transferable, personal and subject specific skills to enhance their employability on completing their postgraduate degree.

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel and what you will learn on the course.

 

Entry Requirements
  • A minimum score of 60%- 70% or GPA 2.8/4 - 3.4/4. Offers within the grade range are determined by the higher education institution attended.
  • IELTS: 6.5 (min 6 in all areas)
  • Pearson: 58 (51 in all subscores)
  • BrunELT: 65% (min 60% in all areas)
Foundation Campus
No Foundation
Course Option
Course Duration: 1 years
Course Fee:  14800.00
Course Level:  POSTGRADUATE
Application Deadline 
International Student:   (15,July)
Location
Country:  UNITED KINGDOM
Campus Location:  Brunel University London, Kingston Lane Uxbridge Middlesex UB8 3PH
Intake Deadline
SEPTEMBER