Study in SWEDEN

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University of Hertfordshire

  11 REVIEWS 26429 VIEWS

A new type of university – innovative, enterprising and business-facing with a commitment to adding value to employers, enterprise, regional and national economies.

Why Study Here :

  • The University of Hertfordshire is one of the top 100 universities in the world under 50 years old according to the Times Higher Education 100 under 50 rankings 2015.
  • We are included in the Times Higher Education list of the 100 most international universities in the world published in January 2015.
  • The University is one of the top 20 universities in the world to study animation according to this month's 3DWorld magazine (April 2012).
  • The University's formula student team is the most successful UK team.
About Sweden

About The Sweden

Sweden (SwedishSverige officially the Kingdom of Sweden is a Scandinavian country in Northern Europe. It borders Norway to the west and north and Finland to the east, and is connected to Denmark in the southwest by a bridge-tunnel across the Öresund, a strait at the Swedish-Danish border. At 450,295 square kilometres (173,860 sq mi), Sweden is the third-largest country in the European Union by area. Sweden has a total population of 10.2 million of which 2.4 million has a foreign background. It has a low population density of 22 inhabitants per square kilometre (57/sq mi). The highest concentration is in the southern half of the country.

Germanic peoples have inhabited Sweden since prehistoric times, emerging into history as the Geats (Swedish Götar) and Swedes (Svear) and constituting the sea peoples known as the Norsemen. Southern Sweden is predominantly agricultural, while the north is heavily forested. Sweden is part of the geographical area of Fennoscandia. The climate is in general very mild for its northerly latitude due to significant maritime influence, that in spite of this still retains warm continental summers. Today, Sweden is a constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy, with a monarch as head of state, like its neighbour Norway. The capital city is Stockholm, which is also the most populous city in the country. Legislative power is vested in the 349-member unicameral RiksdagExecutive power is exercised by the government chaired by the prime minister. Sweden is a unitary state, currently divided into 21 counties and 290 municipalities.

Sweden Weather

Sweden weather and what to wear

Most of Sweden has a temperate climate, despite its northern latitude, with largely four distinct seasons and mild temperatures throughout the year. The winter in the far south is usually weak and is only manifested through some shorter periods with snow and sub-zero temperatures, autumn may well turn into spring there, without a distinct period of winter. The country can be divided into three types of climate: the southernmost part has an oceanic climate, the central part has a humid continental climate and the northernmost part has a subarctic climate. However, Sweden is much warmer and drier than other places at a similar latitude, and even somewhat farther south, mainly because of the combination of the Gulf Stream and the general west wind drift, caused by the direction of planet Earth's rotation. Continental west-coasts (to which all of Scandinavia belongs, as the westernmost part of the Eurasian continent), are notably warmer than continental east-coasts; this can also be seen by comparing e.g. the Canadian cities of Vancouver and Halifax, Nova Scotia with each other, the winter in west coast Vancouver is much milder; also, for example, central and southern Sweden has much milder winters than many parts of Russia, Canada, and the northern United States. Because of its high latitude, the length of daylight varies greatly. North of the Arctic Circle, the sun never sets for part of each summer, and it never rises for part of each winter. In the capital, Stockholm, daylight lasts for more than 18 hours in late June but only around 6 hours in late December. Sweden receives between 1,100 and 1,900 hours of sunshine annually. During July there is not much difference in temperature between the north and south of the country. With the exception of in the mountains, the whole country has a July-average temperature within the range of +15.0 C to + 17.5 C (a difference of 2.5 degrees), while the January-average temperatures vary from freezing point down to below −15 C along the border with Finland (a difference of 15 degrees)

Mountains

The Scandinavian Mountains

The highest temperature ever recorded in Sweden was 38 °C (100 °F) in Målilla in 1947, while the coldest temperature ever recorded was −52.6 °C (−62.7 °F) in Vuoggatjålme in 1966. Temperatures expected in Sweden are heavily influenced by the large Fennoscandian landmass, as well as continental Europe and western Russia, which allows hot or cool inland air to be easily transported to Sweden. That in turn renders most of Sweden's southern areas having warmer summers than almost everywhere in the nearby British Isles, even matching temperatures found along the continental Atlantic coast as far south as in northern Spain. In winter however the same high-pressure systems sometimes puts the entire country far below freezing temperatures. There is some maritime moderation from the Atlantic which renders the Swedish continental climate less severe than that of nearby Russia. Even though temperature patterns differ between north and south, the summer climate is surprisingly similar all through the entire country in spite of the large latitudal differences. This is due to the south being surrounded by a greater mass of water, with the wider Baltic Sea and the Atlantic air passing over lowland areas from the south-west.

Apart from the ice-free Atlantic bringing marine air into Sweden tempering winters, the mildness is further explained by prevailing low-pressure systems postponing winter, with the long nights often staying above freezing in the south of the country due to the abundant cloud cover. By the time winter finally breaks through, daylight hours rise quickly, ensuring that daytime temperatures soar quickly in spring. With the greater number of clear nights, frosts remain commonplace quite far south as late as April. The cold winters occur when low-pressure systems are weaker. An example is that the coldest ever month (January 1987) in Stockholm was also the sunniest January month on record.

The relative strength of low and high-pressure systems of marine and continental air also define the highly variable summers. When hot continental air hits the country, the long days and short nights frequently bring temperatures up to 30 °C (86 °F) or above even in coastal areas. Nights normally remain cool, especially in inland areas. Coastal areas can see so-called tropical nights above 20 °C (68 °F) occur due to the moderating sea influence during warmer summers.[86] Summers can be cool, especially in the north of the country. Transitional seasons are normally quite extensive and the four-season climate applies to most of Sweden's territory, except in Scania where some years do not record a meteorological winter (see table below) or in the high Lapland mountains where polar microclimates exist.

On average, most of Sweden receives between 500 and 800 mm (20 and 31 in) of precipitation each year, making it considerably drier than the global average. The south-western part of the country receives more precipitation, between 1,000 and 1,200 mm (39 and 47 in), and some mountain areas in the north are estimated to receive up to 2,000 mm (79 in). Despite northerly locations, southern and central Sweden may have almost no snow in some winters. Most of Sweden is located in the rain shadow of the Scandinavian Mountains through Norway and north-west Sweden. The blocking of cool and wet air in summer as well as the greater landmass leads to warm and dry summers far north in the country, with quite warm summers at the Bothnia Bay coast at 65 degrees latitude, which is unheard of elsewhere in the world at such northerly coastlines.

Holidays and Festivals

The day before an official holiday is generally is many cases taken as a de facto holiday. A de facto holiday can be acknowledged as a full day or half day off work. There are three official de facto holidays in Sweden, the eves of New Year, Midsummer and Christmas. Swedish main official public holidays (shown in bold text) observed during the year:


  • New Year´s Day – 1 January
    •Epiphany Eve – 5 January, also known as Twelfth Night, may be celebrated with a half days off work or a whole days off work as it is a non-official de facto holiday
    •Epiphany Day – 6 January. This is a day celebrated to commemorate the visit of the Magi to Jesus when he was a baby. It is the 13th day after Christmas, and is the last holiday of Swedish Christmas festival.
  • Good Friday – The Friday before Easter, to commemorate the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ and is the second of the major Christian festivals. It usually falls in March or April. Sunday and Monday are follow-on public holidays. The day before Good Friday, is known as Maundy Thursday, is also a shortened workday.
    •Easter Sunday – Date varies, this day is also known as Easter Day. It is generally the most favoured day of the Easter period;as it is celebrated by hiding and finding chocolate eggs, which are decorated in bright and assorted shiny crinkly wrapping paper. There is also a school holiday over the Easter period.
    •Easter Monday – Date varies and also known as Easter Monday
    •Walpurgus Night – April 30, de facto holiday
    •May Day – May 1
    •Ascension Day – 39 days after Easter. This day is about celebrating to commemorate the resurrection and ascension of Jesus Christ into Heaven. It is also a day of a Church festival and is celebrated 40 days after Easter and is always on a Thursday. 
    •Whit Sunday – Date varies, and also known as Pentecost. This day is celebrated ten days after Ascension Day. This is the day that is remembered as the day the Holy Ghost descended on the Apostles and the Christian church was founded.
    •Whit Monday – Date varies, de facto holiday
    •Sweden's National Day – June 6
    •Midsummer´s Eve – Date varies, and is a de facto holiday
    •Midsummer's Day – Date varies
    •All Saint’s Eve – de facto holiday
    •All Saints´Day – November 1. This is a special day celebrated in memory of the dead and falls on a Saturday in the beginning of November.
    •Christmas Eve – December 24, is a de facto holiday
    •Christmas Day – December 25
    •Boxing Day – December 26
    •New Year´s Eve – December 31, is a de facto holiday
Food In the Sweden

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Places to visit

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It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using 'Content here, content here', making it look like readable English. Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for 'lorem ipsum' will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like).

What language are spoken

The official language of Sweden is Swedish, a North Germanic language, related and very similar to Danish and Norwegian, but differing in pronunciation and orthography. Norwegians have little difficulty understanding Swedish, and Danes can also understand it, with slightly more difficulty than Norwegians. The same goes for standard Swedish speakers, who find it far easier to understand Norwegian than Danish. The dialects spoken in Scania, the southernmost part of the country, are influenced by Danish because the region traditionally was a part of Denmark and is nowadays situated closely to it. Sweden Finns are Sweden's largest linguistic minority, comprising about 5% of Sweden's population, and Finnish is recognised as a minority language. Owing to a recent influx of native speakers of Arabic in latter years, the use of Arabic is likely more widespread in the country than that of Finnish. However, no official statistics are kept on language use.

Along with Finnish, four other minority languages are also recognised: MeänkieliSamiRomani, and Yiddish. Swedish became Sweden's official language on 1 July 2009, when a new language law was implemented. The issue of whether Swedish should be declared the official language had been raised in the past, and the Riksdag voted on the matter in 2005, but the proposal narrowly failed.

In varying degrees, depending largely on frequency of interaction with English, a majority of Swedes, especially those born after World War II, understand and speak English, owing to trade links, the popularity of overseas travel, a strong Anglo-American influence and the tradition of subtitling rather than dubbing foreign television shows and films, and the relative similarity of the two languages which makes learning English easier. In a 2005 survey by Eurobarometer, 89% of Swedes reported the ability to speak English.

English became a compulsory subject for secondary school students studying natural sciences as early as 1849, and has been a compulsory subject for all Swedish students since the late 1940s. Depending on the local school authorities, English is currently a compulsory subject between first grade and ninth grade, with all students continuing in secondary school studying English for at least another year. Most students also study one and sometimes two additional languages. These include (but are not limited to) German, French and Spanish. Some Danish and Norwegian is at times also taught as part of Swedish courses for native speakers. Because of the extensive mutual intelligibility between the three continental Scandinavian languages Swedish speakers often use their native language when visiting or living in Norway or Denmark.

WHY STUDY IN Sweden

1. Creativity is central

When you study in Sweden, you’re encouraged to think independently, creatively and critically. You’ll develop your ability to question the status quo by assessing information, seeking new perspectives and coming up with well-informed opinions. You’ll be free to think creatively because of the informal and non-hierarchical nature of Swedish society, where everyone is encouraged to contribute ideas and opinions.

This independence of mind and the fact that everyone can make their voice heard are two of the reasons why Sweden ranks among the world’s most innovative nations.Another is that investment in research is among the highest in the world in relation to GDP.

Sweden’s status as a leader in innovation and a home of trendsetters and early adopters is nothing new: the list of Swedish world-changing inventions is a long one and includes the seatbelt, the pacemaker and the music service Spotify. Which one of your brilliant ideas will Sweden help make reality?

Sofia Sabel, Lars Lundberg, Spotify

2. Coursework is challenging – in a good way

Sweden has a long and proud history of academic excellence and despite its relatively small population, it’s home to some of the world’s best universities. The entire Swedish higher education system is ranked as one of the best in the world, and several Swedish universities are ranked by the Times Higher Education and the Academic Ranking of World Universities as being among the world’s best.

In Sweden you’ll find a strong focus on rationality, reason and applying knowledge so that it makes a real difference. Look no further than the Nobel Prize, the world’s most prestigious academic distinction, for an illustration of the Swedish approach.

As a student here you’ll become part of this tradition of academic excellence. Just don’t expect to passively receive information: you’ll be encouraged and challenged to contribute, speak your mind and take your education into your own hands.

Swedish universities are well-adapted to the needs of international students, and Sweden consistently ranks in the top three in the world for English proficiency. You’ll be able to use English with everyone you meet, from the classroom to city the centre.

3. Sustainability and the environment are in focus

If you’re concerned with sustainable development for a greener future, you’ll feel right at home in Sweden. Environmental issues are high priority here, and Sweden has been named the most sustainable country in the world for its use of renewable energy. Sweden is aiming for 100 per cent renewable energy production by 2040.

Anders Ekholm/Folio/imagebank.sweden.se

Environmental thinking and sustainability are a part of all aspects of life here, including education. Studying here will give you the chance to draw on Sweden’s deep environmental experience and apply its sustainable approach to your own chosen field.

And it’s not hard to see why Swedes are so keen to protect the environment: nature here is breathtaking, with huge forests, beautiful beaches and snow-capped mountains. Sweden’s 29 national parks and nearly 4,000 nature reserves offer you the opportunity to ski, hike, fish, swim and mountain bike.

4. Equality and diversity are central to Swedish society

Swedish society is known for its inclusiveness and equality – you may have heard Sweden referred to as the most equal country in the world. It consistently places among the world’s top countries in gender equality, while lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights in Sweden are regarded as among the most progressive in the world.

The belief that everyone is of equal value contributes to Sweden’s consensus approachto getting things done, where everyone takes part in the decision-making process. During your studies, you’ll learn how to balance different interests, needs and ideas to bring out the best in everyone and solve complex issues as a team – vital skills for your global career, where teamwork across cultures is the norm.

Photo: Melker Dahlstrand/imagebank.sweden.se

5. You’ll learn skills for a global career

What’s the most important thing you’ll need for success in your career? According to a global study of CEOs, it’s creativity. And creativity is exactly what studying in Sweden will foster, along with other in-demand skills such as how to combine theory and practice, and how to navigate complex situations where there’s no easy solution.

Many degree programmes in Sweden include internships, which are a great way to get real-world experience while you build your professional network. If you’re interested in research, doing a master’s in Sweden can be a great way to make the contacts you’ll need to carry on and do a PhD.

The fact that Sweden is home to the largest number of multinationals per capita of any country in the world and is the birthplace of many world-conquering companies – including IKEA, TetraPak, Volvo, Ericsson, AstraZeneca and H&M – means that getting on the career ladder here can really take you places. Should you receive a job offer while you’re still studying here, you can apply for a work permit and enjoy the work-life balance that Sweden is famous for.

Bonus: life is international student-friendly

So Sweden is green, creative, equal and open. What else should you know before you decide to study here?

  • Everyone speaks English– Sweden regularly ranks as one of the top countries in the world for non-native speakers of English. That means you don’t have to speak any Swedish to study here.
  • Public transport is widespread, and it works.Sweden’s extensive network of buses, trains, subways, trams, boats, planes and more can take you anywhere you want to go, car-free.
  • International students can work in Sweden.Though your studies are your number-one priority, there’s no legal limit to the amount of hours international  students can work during their studies. After completing your studies, you can apply to extend your residence permit to look for work for up to six months. (If you do want to work, learning Swedish is important – it’s often a requirement for jobs).
  • Sweden is clean and safe, and the standard of living is high.

Ready to get started? We thought so.

BENEFITS OF SWEDEN EDUCATION

Speaking of the unique nature of Swedish higher educational institutions, the most important to consider is the very process of education based on the informal relationship between instructors and students. Such open interrelations facilitate development of creative thinking, which is highly appreciated in terms of cultural traditions of Sweden. It is also the rationale for many foreign students' desire to obtain higher education in a country, the advantages of which include:

  • Close ties between universities and industries, which enables students to undertake profession-oriented practical training several times during the period of study. Typically, students are assigned only to the most advanced enterprises for the intending specialist to master every stage of their future profession.
  • Full independence of institutions of higher education. As a result, increasingly effective training programs are introduced by universities every year, emphasis being placed on the knowledge the graduates will really need for work in industries.
  • Commitment to high standards for the quality of education. Such an approach enables diplomas obtained in Sweden to list equity throughout the entire world, which means every opportunity is opened up for the graduates, wherever they decide to apply their knowledge. Worth noting, the dominant number of Nobel laureates have been conferred a degree at a Swedish university, while Alfred Nobel himself was a native of Sweden.
  • Facilitation of early adaptation of students. Despite Swedish is the official language of the country, foreign students are offered instruction in English.
  • Available a free Education.

Any person wishing to study in English should submit to the Admission Committee their TOEFL results of at least 90 scores (at least 6.5 scores for the IELTS). The required figures may be scaled back depending on the academic ranking of the institution and the specialty chosen. The performance appraisal rating system is absent as such, the student either passes or fails. Applicants lacking a proper command of Swedish or English can take university-based language courses to proceed to the academic training upon completion.

AVAILABLE STUDY OPTIONS
Bachelor's Course in Sweden

There are several ways for a prospective student to be admitted for a Bachelor's course:

If the person seeking the Bachelor's degree is admitted to a home university that concluded an agreement on exchange of students with Swedish universities, the person may come to study in Sweden for one semester or one year to receive a Swedish diploma upon fulfillment of all the required tasks.

The person may matriculate after graduating a high school, as described above.

The Bachelor's degree granted by a Swedish university is a certificate of higher education, which enables the recent graduate to occupy an executive position in any country worldwide.

Master's Course in Sweden

University graduate students and persons who have a university diploma or a master's degree in another specialization may be admitted for a Master's course.

For admission, applicants should submit their grade records translated in English or Swedish. After the letter of invitation is received, the requested package of documents must be sent to the Swedish university within specified time limits; otherwise, the applicant may be dismissed. When a holder of Bachelor's degree applies for a postgraduate course, and the specializations of the postgraduate program and the applicant's diploma of higher education are concurrent, some universities may require a document confirming experience in the chosen specialization.

Postgraduate Course in Sweden

First preference is given to masters who are conducting research in the specialization they plan to study at postgraduate level, but bachelors are also allowed for admission. Applicants may be requested to submit not only their grade records, but also publications or rational proposals. Postgraduate studies lack a centralized approach; therefore, those wishing to take a course need to keep track of information submitted by Swedish universities to chance an available space. Practicing professors may also invite graduate students on the basis of interviews; however, people suitable for a specific research are usually sought in such cases.

EXPLORE THE SWEDEN
Where to go in Sweden

Whether your idea of a great vacation is taking in culture or experiencing the great outdoors, Sweden offers something for everyone!

The Ancient Forest of Tyresta National Park is Sweden's natural landscape at its most majestic. Surprisingly close to Stockholm, the park offers unparallelled hiking trails and views of its beautiful forests and lakes.

The Scandinavian Party Cruise from Stockholm is the quintessential weekend party. The cruise includes two nights on the largest archipelago in the world. Not only will you spend a day in Stockholm, but also a day Helsinki, capital of Finland!

For those wanting a closer view, Archipelago Kayak and Camping is a three-day adventure taking place in one of the archipelago's best paddling areas. It's a fun and exciting trip not to be missed!

The Stockholm Bike Tour is the ideal way to explore the capital city. See incredible sights like Stockholm Palace, historic Old Town and the Vasa Museum, where you can see the world's only preserved 17th century ship!

The Wildlife Safari in Stockholm is the best bet for those wanting to experience Sweden's wildlife. Only 20 minutes from Stockholm, the safari offers a chance to see Sweden's deer, wild boar, moose, birds, and more!

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT
What is the requirement?
Bachelor's level

For courses and study programmes at the bachelor's level, the English language general entry requirement is the equivalent of English studies at upper secondary (high school) level in Sweden, called English 6.

Master's level

For most master's level courses and programmes, the requirement is also the equivalent of English 6, though some may require a lower or higher level of English.

Check the course description

You can find out what the English requirement is for the course or programme you’re applying to by going to the course description page on the university’s website. Please note that some universities have their own requirements regarding what is needed in order to demonstrate English proficiency.

How can I meet the English language requirement?

You can demonstrate that you meet the English language requirement through:

HOW TO APPLY
One application

Sweden is unique in that we have a coordinated admissions system. This means that applicants can apply for courses and programmes at all universities on the same application – and right here at Universityadmissions.se!

Convenient electronic application and process

All of our international applicants apply electronically for courses and programmes. Here on Universityadmissions.se, you can:

  • create a user account
  • search for courses and programmes
  • fill out and send in your application
  • pay your application fee, if required
  • upload your required documents
  • follow your application
  • receive and print out your Notification of Selection Results
  • reply to any offers of admission (Second round only)

Follow the steps in this section to complete your application quickly and correctly.

One set of supporting documents

Students must submit documentation in support of their application. These documents can include upper secondary school transcripts, university transcripts and English test results. The documents you upload or send in to University Admissions in Sweden are scanned into our electronic admissions system. In that way, no matter where an admissions officer is in Sweden, he or she can bring up your record and look at all of your documents and your application information.

Preliminary assessment

Your application will be registered and checked in several steps and by different institutions. Because of the number of applications that we receive, this process can take some time.

Please note that in some cases, the final assessment will not be made until the very last week before selection.

Notification of selection results

Once the selection results have been published, you will receive an email reminder to log in to 'My pages' and check your results.

Your notification will be accessible online as well as in a printable PDF-file. If you are offered a place, read the instructions about applying for a student residence permit and payment of tuition fees (if required), as well as any information about enrollment/registration days or introductory meetings held by the university.

Reply online - Second round

If you applied for the Second round for the autumn or spring semester (application deadlines 15 April and 15 October), you will be required to reply online to your first Notification of Selection Results. If you fail to reply, or reply after the deadline, you will lose your place. Please be sure to reply on time!

If you applied to the First round for the autumn or spring semester (application deadlines 15 January and 15 August), you do not need to reply to your offer.

BOARDING SCHOOLS

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LEARN ENGLISH

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FOUNDATION PATHWAY

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UNDERGRADUATE

Bachelor's level is also known as first cycle in the European Region. You may also be familiar with the term 'undergraduate'. In Sweden, there is a wide range of international courses available at this level, but a limited number of study programmes. These courses and programmes are taught in English. Very basically, a student must have completed upper secondary studies in order to be qualified for study at this level.

POSTGRADUATE

The next level is master's, also known as second cycle in the European Region. The term 'graduate level' can also be used. Universities in Sweden offer a large range of international master's programmes where the language of instruction is English. These programmes are open to both Swedish and international students who have earned a bachelor's degree (equivalent to a Swedish kandidatexamen).

PHD/DBA/RESEARCH

After having earned a master's degree, students have the possibility of continuing their university studies at the doctoral level. Students interested in studying at the doctoral level have a different admissions process than students studying at other levels. This process is coordinated by the universities; therefore, you must contact them for application instructions.

SCHOLARSHIP & FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Students with citizenship in countries not within the EU/EEA, or Switzerland, are required to pay application and tuition fees for university studies in Sweden. 

Some tuition scholarships are available for students who wish to study in Sweden. Please note that all students who are required to pay an application fee must pay that fee, even if they've applied for a scholarship.

Paying your tuition fees

Unlike the application fee, which is paid to University Admissions in Sweden, tuition fees are paid directly to the university the student plans on attending.

It is up to each individual university to decide the tuition costs for their courses and programmes. 

Information regarding tuition fees can be found in the course search results here at Universityadmissions.se, or on the websites of each school. Each course and programme has information regarding the first instalment, or the amount that first must be paid, and the total fee for the entire course or programme.

Tuition fees are paid to the university

Students should pay the first instalment of their tuition cost as soon as they have been offered a place and have accepted their offer. This information will be provided when the Notification of Selection Results is published. Please see Key dates for further information.

It is important to meet any deadlines for payment of tuition fees that are given to you by your university. They will give you instructions on how to make your payment. This process may differ for individual universities.

When should the tuition fee be paid?

In Sweden, all offers of admission are considered preliminary until the student has paid the first instalment of his or her tuition fee. Applications for a residence permit will not be approved until the Swedish Migration Agency receives notification from your university that your first tuition fee instalment has been paid.

Students should submit their residence permit application to the Swedish Migration Agency as soon as they receive their Notification of Selection Results and pay their first tuition fee instalment to their school.

The easiest and fastest way to apply for a residence permit is to use the online application at the Swedish Migration Agency's website. Here's a link to information about applying for a residence permit:

Conditionally admitted and your tuition fee

Students who are required to pay tuition fees will be listed as 'Conditionally admitted' on their Notification of Selection Results. At this time, our computer system cannot record when a student has paid the first instalment of their tuition fee to their university. Your status will still be listed as 'Conditionally admitted,' even after you've paid the tuition fee.

Please note: There are other reasons why a student may have been conditionally admitted. If this is the case, you will have received information regarding what you need to do in order to finalise your acceptance.

Scholarships

Scholarships are available from the Swedish Institute and individual universities for international students wishing to study in Sweden. The scholarship application process does not take place on this website. Please see the following link for more information about applying for scholarships.

 

Sweden Government Scholarships for International Students »

 Swedish Institute Study Scholarships

The Swedish Institute Study Scholarships target highly-qualified students and are awarded for studies in Sweden starting in an autumn semester. The scholarships are intended for full-time master’s level studies in Sweden and cover both living costs and tuition fees.

 

The Visby Programme Scholarships

The Visby Programme provides a number of full scholarships for master’s programmes in Sweden to students from Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine. The scholarship covers the tuition fee, living expenses of SEK 9,000 per month, insurance, and a one-time travel grant of SEK 5,000.

See all scholarships funded by Swedish Institute specific to your country.

 University Scholarships in Sweden for International Students »

 Blenkinge Institute of Technology Scholarship Programme

BTH scholarship programme for prospective students is available for citizens from non-EU/EEA countries who are required to pay tuition fees for Swedish university education. This scholarship programme offers scholarships covering tuition fees in part. The available levels of tuition fee reductions are 50% and 75%.

 

University of Borås Tuition Fee Waivers

The University of Borås offers tuition fee waivers to highly qualified students required to pay tuition fees and who are applying for eligible Masters Programmes at the University. The scholarships are intended to cover the tuition fee by approximately 75%, they are not designed to cover living costs

Chalmers IPOET Scholarships

The IPOET Scholarships are open to citizens from non-EU/EEA countries who are required to pay tuition fees and who are applying to Master’s Programmes offered at Chalmers University.  The scholarships is a 75% reduction of the tuition fees.

The University of Gothenburg Study Scholarship

The University of Gothenburg Study Scholarship is aimed at applicants who have to pay tuition fees for their Masters Programme studies at the University.  The scholarship covers the tuition fee for the student’s study programme.

Halmstad University Scholarships

Each year, Halmstad University offers a number of scholarships to qualified students from outside the EU/EEA and Switzerland who are required to pay tuition fees. These scholarships are towards Master’s Programmes within any field of study offered at the University. The Halmstad University Scholarship covers 25% or 50% of the tuition fee and will be deducted from the tuition fee.

 

Karlstad University Global Scholarship Progamme

The Karlstad University Global Scholarship programme aims to attract top academic students from countries outside the EU/EEA (and Switzerland) who are required to pay tuition fees for studies. Scholarships cover 25%, 50%, 75% or 100% of the tuition fees.

 

Karolinska Institutet Global Master’s Scholarship

The Karolinska Institutet Global Master’s Scholarships only cover the tuition fee cost, not living expenses, and only for studies at Master’s level.

 

Kristianstad University Scholarships

The scholarship will be awarded to citizens of a country outside the EU/EEA who are required to pay tuition fee for studies at Kristianstad University. If granted a scholarship, it will include a full or partial reduction of the tuition fee.

 

KTH Royal Institute of Technology Tuition Fee Waivers

A limited number of tuition fee waivers will be available for citizens from non-EU/EEA/EFTA countries who are required to pay tuition fees and who has applied for a Master’s programme at KTH.  If granted a scholarship, the tuition fee will be waived for the total length of the programme.

 

Linnaeus University Scholarships

Linnaeus University Scholarships are for students who are from a country outside the EU/EEA and Switzerland and who have applied for a study programme at Linnaeus University.  The scholarships usually cover 75 percent of the tuition fee but a few scholarship from the Linnaeus Academy of Science and Business cover 100 percent of the tuition fee.

Linköping International Scholarships

The LiU International Scholarship is aimed at supporting international students with significant academic potential from countries outside the EU/EEA (and Switzerland) who are required to pay tuition fees for studies. With LiU International Scholarships, tuition fees are reduced by 25, 50, 75 or 100%.

Lund University Global Scholarship Programme

The Lund University Global Scholarship Programme is targeted at top academic students who are citizens of countries from outside the EU/EEA (and Switzerland) and are required to pay a tuition fee  The scholarships are available for Bachelor’s or Master’s level studies.  Scholarships may cover 25%, 50%, 75% or 100% of the tuition fee.

Mälardalen University Scholarships

Every year, Mälardalen University offers a limited numbers of scholarships to students coming from countries outside of EU/EEA/Switzerland who are required to pay tuition fees and who are applying for a master’s programme at the University as their first choice.  The scholarship will cover 100% of the tuition fee of the programme as long as you follow the normal study plan. The scholarship does not cover living expenses.

Malmö University Master’s Scholarship

The Malmö University Master’s Scholarship (MUMS) is for highly talented students who are citizens of a country outside the EU/EEA/Switzerland and are admitted to an English-taught master’s programme at Malmö University. The scholarship covers the entire tuition fee.

Mid Sweden University Tuition Fee Scholarships

All students who have applied to a study a Master’s programme at Mid Sweden University and who are required to pay tuition fees are welcome to apply for a Mid Sweden University Tuition Fee Scholarship. The scholarship is a tuition fee reduction of 70,000 SEK or 250,000 SEK depending on the chosen programme.

Örebro University Scholarship Programme

The Örebro University Scholarship programme is aimed at top academic students from countries outside the EU/EEA and Switzerland, who are required to pay tuition fees for studies. The scholarship covers full or partial tuition fees but does not cover living expenses.

 

Skovde University Scholarships

The University of Skövde offers a small number of scholarships to students who are attending a master’s programme at the University and who are liable for tuition fees. The scholarships are partial tuition fee waivers.

Stockholm University Scholarship Scheme

The scholarship scheme at Stockholm University is aimed at especially qualified students admitted for Master programmes coming from countries outside of EU/EEA/Switzerland and who are required to pay tuition fees. Stockholm University scholarships cover tuition fees only, which means that students will need to cover their own living costs.

Umea University Scholarships

Umeå University offers a limited number of scholarships to high-achieving students from outside the EU/EEA who are applying for a Master’s degree programme at Umeå University. Selected candidates receive a full or partial reduction of the tuition fee.

Uppsala IPK Scholarships

Uppsala University’s IPK scholarships are targeted to citizens of a country outside the EU/EEA and Switzerland and are towards Master’s programmes offered at the University. These scholarships cover the cost of tuition but not living expenses.

MONEY & COSTS

The krona is the official currency of Sweden. Both the ISO code "SEK" and currency sign "kr" are in common use; the former precedes or follows the value, the latter usually follows it but, especially in the past, it sometimes preceded the value. In English, the currency is sometimes referred to as the Swedish crown, as krona literally means crown in Swedish. The Swedish krona was the ninth-most traded currency in the world by value in April 2016.

ACCOMODATION

As an international student looking for housing, your first point of contact should always be your university. Most universities offer accommodation services for international students, which can include providing guaranteed housing or giving advice on where to find a room on your own. The exact offer will vary between universities. If you’re not sure how to find the accommodation service at your university, check with your programme coordinator or international office.

The availability of student accommodation also varies considerably from place to place. It’s usually easier to find accommodation in small and medium-sized towns and cities, while finding a room can be more challenging in larger cities, especially Stockholm and Gothenburg and in the traditional student cities of Lund and Uppsala.

You can choose to live in student accommodation or find a home on the private market. Always investigate options for student accommodation through your university or related student housing companies as your first step, as rent costs are likely lower and student accommodation can be much easier to find than private.

Student accommodation

Many students choose to live in a student residence hall, also known as a dormitory, or in a building of student flats. This is usually a fun experience that gives you the chance to get to know corridormates from around the world.

Most residence halls have 10-15 single rooms in each corridor, often with a shared television room and kitchen. In some cases, rooms will have en-suite toilets, while others may have shared facilities for the corridor. Female and male students live in the same corridor.

Susanne Walström/imagebank.sweden.se

Student flats usually include two to four bedrooms along with a shared living room, kitchen and toilet. Studio (one-room) student flats are also often available.

Both residence halls and student flats usually offer shared laundry facilities for the building. Sometimes a small fee will be charged for laundry, but in most cases laundry is free of charge for residents.

Students are responsible for cleaning their own rooms and the shared kitchen. Although rooms are usually let with basic furniture, you’ll usually need to provide your own blankets, pillows, sheets, towels and light bulbs. Some utensils may be available but you’ll often have to buy your own plates, cutlery, pots and pans, and other kitchen utensils. These are sometimes available to let through your student union.

Unlike in some other countries, student accommodation in Sweden is nearly always managed by organisations or companies separate from the university itself. However, most universities help to arrange housing in halls or flats for international students. Your university will have information on the local student housing companies and organisations and how to sign up. Often, you will have to join a queue system, where you apply for available rooms or flats based on how long you’ve been in the queue.

Private accommodation

If you’re not able to find housing through your university, or if the options available don’t suit you, then you can look for room or flat on the private market.

In most cities in Sweden, most rental flats are managed by central housing services that operate queue systems for so-called ‘first-hand’ rental contracts, or contracts directly between the tenant and the owner of the property. Residents sign up for a queue in their city and are then able to apply for flats, which are allocated based on queue time. In large and medium-sized cities like Stockholm, Gothenburg, Malmö, Uppsala or Lund, queue times for a flat can be several years. As such, on the private market the most common solution for students is finding a sublet.

Through a sublet, or ‘second-hand’ contract, you sign a contract to let a flat or a room in a flat from the current tenant. The contract terms depend on what you agree on with the person letting the flat, but usually cover the length of the rental, the monthly rent and what is included in the rent (e.g. internet, electricity and heating). For an example of a sample contract as well as lots of general advice on finding a flat, have a look at Studentboet.se.

The housing office at your university should be able to offer general advice on finding private accommodation in your city, and may have information on available flats. Many student unions also have websites that help new students find available rooms. In addition to the information provided by your university, the following websites offer listings for sublets (most of these websites are in Swedish; use Google Translate or another translation tool to translate the listings):

Avoiding fraudsters

As in all countries, it’s important to be aware of fraudsters when searching for a flat on the private market. Never send a payment before you’ve seen the flat and signed a contract, and don’t send money through anonymous payment services. Always ask to see identification for the person signing the contract as well as proof that he or she has the right to let the flat to you. If you feel unsure about a situation, you can always ask staff at your university for assistance.

Rent and other costs

Monthly rent costs vary considerably between locations. For a student room or a room in a student flat, monthly rent ranges between roughly SEK 2,500 and SEK 6,500, with smaller towns at the lower end of the scale and Stockholm at the high end. On the private market, costs can be higher, especially in cities.

If you’re living in private accommodation, make sure to find out which costs your monthly rent covers. In the majority of cases, your monthly rent will cover heating and water, but depending on your contract, you may be responsible for paying for electricity, internet or other costs.

TRAVEL & TOURISM

Rail transport is operated by SJDSBFirstGreen CargoTågkompaniet and more. Most counties have companies that do ticketing, marketing and financing of local passenger rail, but the actual operation are done by the above-mentioned companies.

  • Total: 11,663 km (includes 3,594 km of privately (in fact county) owned railways) or 9227 km of national railways
  • standard gauge: 11,568 km 1,435 mm(4 ft 8 12 in) gauge (7,531 km electrified and 1,152 km double track) (2008)
  • narrow gauge: 65 km of 891 mm(2 ft 11 332 in) gauge (2008)
  • Trains generally keep to the left, as opposed to all neighbouring countries.
Light rail and metros

Stockholm Metro (Stockholms Tunnelbana) is the only metro system in Sweden.

Cities with light rail (trams);

Stockholm previously had a large tram network, but this was discontinued in favour of bus and metro; a revival of the tram network was seen in the construction of Tvärbanan in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Railway links with adjacent countries

Road traffic

Above: Left-hand traffic in Slussen in 1963. Below: Right-hand traffic in Slussen in 2007.

Sweden has right-hand traffic today like all its neighbours.

Sweden had left-hand traffic (Vänstertrafik in Swedish) from approximately 1736 and continued to do so until 1967. Despite this virtually all cars in Sweden were actually left-hand drive and the neighbouring Nordic countries already drove on the right, leading to mistakes by visitors. The Swedish voters rejected a change to driving on the right in a referendum held in 1955.

Nevertheless, in 1963 the Riksdag passed legislation ordering the switch to right-hand traffic. The changeover took place on a Sunday morning at 5am on September 3, 1967, which was known in Swedish as Dagen H (H-Day), the 'H' standing for Högertrafik or right-hand traffic.

Since Swedish cars were left-hand drive, experts had suggested that changing to driving on the right would reduce accidents, because drivers would have a better view of the road ahead. Indeed, fatal car-to-car and car-to-pedestrian accidents did drop sharply as a result. This was likely due to drivers initially being more careful and because of the initially very low speed limits, since accident rates soon returned to nearly the same as earlier.

Total roadways: 572,900 km, as of 2009.

Motorways

Motorways run through SwedenDenmark and over the Öresund Bridge to StockholmGothenburgUppsala and Uddevalla. The system of motorways is still being extended. The longest continuous motorways are Värnamo-Gävle (E4; 585 km) and Rabbalshede-Vellinge (E6; 412 km; will by 2013 be extended so the motorway between Trelleborg and Osloin Norway will be completed).

HEALTH & WELFARE

Health insurance guidelines vary depending on your country of citizenship.

Please note that the information on this page only applies for students on bachelor’s and master’s programmes, not for PhD students. PhD students should contact the Swedish Social Insurance Agency or their universities for information on health insurance.

EU/EEA/Swiss citizens

If you’re a citizen of any of the EU/EEA countries or Switzerland, you should register for a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) in your home country before coming to Sweden. This card gives you the right to medical care at the same cost as Swedes. The European Commission has developed an EHIC app with more information on the card and how it works.

If you’re not able to receive your EHIC before leaving home due to long waiting times, you can request a temporary certificate from the same office in your home country that issues the EHIC.

If you don’t obtain an EHIC in your home country, you’ll need to arrange your own insurance coverage to cover costs, as medical care without insurance can be very expensive. However, you always have access to emergency care.

If you’ll be staying in Sweden for more than a year, you can register with the Swedish Tax Agency for a personal identity number. Once you’ve received your number, you’ll be entitled to all healthcare and pay Swedish patient fees.

Non-EU/EEA citizens: stays of one year or more

If your degree programme is longer than one year, you’re entitled to the same health benefits as Swedes after registering with the Swedish Tax Agency in order to receive a personal identity number. Once you’ve received your number, you’ll be entitled to all healthcare and pay Swedish patient fees.

Do note that this doesn’t cover your journey to Sweden or the time you spend in the country prior to receiving your personal identity number. To be fully covered for that period, you will need some form of insurance from your home country. You should also check with your university to find out if they provide any additional insurance coverage for international students.

Non-EU/EEA citizens: stays of less than one year

If you have a residence permit valid for a period of less than a year, you won’t be able to obtain a personal identity number, which means you won’t have automatic access to health insurance. However, your university may provide you with health insurance coverage through the Swedish State Insurance Agency’s (Kammarkollegiet) plan. Check with your university to find out if they offer this plan.

Sweden also has reciprocal agreements for medical benefits with a number of countries. To find out whether your country has this kind of agreement with Sweden and to learn about terms and procedures if so, contact the social insurance office in your home country or the Swedish Social Insurance Agency.

Students who aren’t covered by any of these agreements must arrange for their own insurance coverage, as medical treatment can be very expensive without any form of insurance. It’s highly recommended to arrange for health insurance from your home country so that you’re covered during your trip to Sweden and as soon as you arrive. After arriving, you can check if your university or student union has a special agreement with an insurance company to provide insurance at a lower cost.

Medical treatment in Sweden

If you need to consult a doctor, you can either make an appointment at the student health centre at your university or go to the local healthcare centre, vårdcentralen. Patient fees vary but are usually about SEK 150-200 for a consultation. Doctors in Sweden speak good English; interpreters between Swedish and other languages can often also be arranged. Check with the staff at your healthcare centre if you need to arrange for an interpreter to find out what options are available.

If you don’t yet have a Swedish personal identity number or European Health Insurance Card (see the information for EU/EEA citizens above), it may be difficult to make an appointment at a healthcare centre. If you have trouble making an appointment at a healthcare centre or if you need urgent care, it’s usually possible to receive treatment at a local acute care centre (närakut). Your university will be able to advise you on the best course of action for short-term international students.

The official website 1177.se offers extensive advice on healthcare topics in several languages as well as a search function (in Swedish) for nearby healthcare centres.

In case of emergency, always call 112. You can also go directly to A&E, known as Akutmottagningen or Akuten, at your nearest hospital (sjukhus). If you are concerned about a non-emergency healthcare issue, you can also ring 1177 for advice.

Pharmacies and medication

Pharmacies in Sweden (apotek) provide prescription and non-prescription medication as well as basic health and beauty products. Some non-prescription medications like basic pain or fever medication can also be found at some grocery stores.

Dental care

Dental care is expensive in Sweden, even for Swedes. As such, it’s a good idea to have a thorough check-up at your dentist before leaving for Sweden. Should you still need to consult a dentist here, visit 1177.se to find local listings.

Vaccinations

There are no vaccination requirements for any international traveller entering Sweden. However, some universities may require a medical certificate as part of the application to their programmes.

FOOD COST

Restaurants

 

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant

100.00 kr

Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course

600.00 kr

McMeal at McDonalds (or Equivalent Combo Meal)

75.00 kr

Domestic Beer (0.5 liter draught)

65.00 kr

Imported Beer (0.33 liter bottle)

60.00 kr

Cappuccino (regular)

34.51 kr

Coke/Pepsi (0.33 liter bottle)

18.21 kr

Water (0.33 liter bottle)

16.52 kr

   

Milk (regular), (1 liter)

10.71 kr

Loaf of Fresh White Bread (500g)

21.16 kr

Rice (white), (1kg)

24.01 kr

Eggs (regular) (12)

26.87 kr

Local Cheese (1kg)

84.01 kr

Chicken Breasts (Boneless, Skinless), (1kg)

90.34 kr

Beef Round (1kg) (or Equivalent Back Leg Red Meat)

138.93 kr

Apples (1kg)

23.71 kr

Banana (1kg)

20.95 kr

Oranges (1kg)

22.59 kr

Tomato (1kg)

26.93 kr

Potato (1kg)

9.54 kr

Onion (1kg)

10.42 kr

Lettuce (1 head)

17.51 kr

Water (1.5 liter bottle)

13.33 kr

Bottle of Wine (Mid-Range)

80.00 kr

Domestic Beer (0.5 liter bottle)

16.19 kr

Imported Beer (0.33 liter bottle)

16.64 kr

Cigarettes 20 Pack (Marlboro)

60.00 kr

 

EU STUDENTS

EU/EEA stands for the European Union and the European Economic Area. If you’re not sure if your country belongs to the EU/EEA, check Universityadmissions.se’s list of EU/EEA countries.

TYPES OF STUDENT VISA
Residence Permit for Studies in Sweden

If you're considering studying in Sweden, you'll be relieved to know that Sweden has a clear easy-to-follow process to apply for studies in Sweden. One great benefit of being granted a residence permit for studies in Sweden is that you have the right to work in Sweden while you study! Sweden is also interested in retaining foreign talent so you'll be able to stay in Sweden 6 months after graduation to apply for jobs in Sweden.

Do I need a student visa to study in Sweden?

In Sweden, students apply for a residence permit for studies and the paperwork that you need to complete to study in Sweden varies depending on whether you are an EU/EEA/Nordic citizen, citizen of Switzerland, or not. The length of time - less than or more than three months - you'll be studying in Sweden can also have an affect on whether or not you'll need to apply for a visa or register with the Swedish Migration Board.

How to apply for a residence permit for studies in Sweden

If you've determined that you'll need to apply for a residence permit for studies, read a step-by-step guide to applying for a the permit or registering with the Swedish Migration Board. Learn about the paperwork and documentation you'll need, and the official government websites to submit your application.

WORK WHILE STUDYING IN THE SWEDEN

As an international student in Sweden, you’re allowed to work alongside your studies – there’s no official limitation for how many hours you can work. However, it’s important to keep your studies as your first priority – even when you don’t have many classroom hours, you’re expected to spend the equivalent of a 40-hour work week reading and working on assignments.

Most universities have careers services that can help you with finding a part-time job during your studies. Many also offer services like employer fairs, CV checks and special events with companies. Websites like Academic Work, StudentConsulting or StudentJob can also be a good place to look for postings.

HOW TO APPLY

For Bachelor

The following steps outline the application process for bachelor’s programmes at Swedish universities. Applications are processed through the central application portal Universityadmissions.se.

Please note that for some programmes, mainly within the fine arts, application procedures and deadlines may vary. Always consult the university’s official website for programme-specific application guidelines.

  1. Find your programme

The first step to applying for a bachelor’s programme is finding the perfect one. Search programmes for the next application round under Programmes. You can also search for programmes directly at Universityadmissions.se. Programme listings are also offered directly at the websites of specific universities.

You can apply for up to eight programmes per application round.

  1. Check entry requirements and deadlines

Each programme is subject to general entry requirements and programme-specific entry requirements. Once you’ve decided on the programmes you’d like to apply for, check both sets of guidelines to determine your eligibility:

If you are currently completing your final year of upper-secondary school (high school), please also see Universityadmissions.se’s information for students in their final year of upper-secondary school.

Also check relevant application dates and deadlines for the upcoming semester. The application deadline for programmes beginning in the autumn semester is usually mid-January.

  1. Apply online

Applications are made through the portal Universityadmissions.se, a central application service where you can apply for up to four different programmes at different universities around Sweden with one application.

The application will include the following:

Students who are not citizens of the EU, EEA or Switzerland are required to pay an application fee of SEK 900 along with their application.

Visit Universityadmissions.se for full details on how to apply and to submit your application. 

  1. Wait to receive notification of acceptance

After the deadline passes, your application will undergo a selection procedure determined by the individual university and based on various criteria, such as grades obtained and results of previous courses and degree projects. All of these will influence the outcome of your application.

The decision on whether to accept an applicant rests with the academic institutions themselves.

You will receive your admission results – the Notification of Selection Results – on Universityadmissions.se on the date relevant for your application round.

If you’re not a citizen of the EU, EEA or Switzerland you will also be required to pay the first instalment of the tuition fee (often the first semester’s tuition) at this point.

  1. Apply for a residence permit

Students who are citizens of countries outside of the EU/EEA planning to study in Sweden for at least three months will need to apply for a residence permit for studies in Sweden. As the application process for residence permits can be lengthy, you should apply as soon as you have received your notification of admission.

See Residence permits and visas for more information on applying for a residence permit for studies in Sweden, as well as information for citizens of EU/EEA/Nordic countries and Switzerland.

  1. Come to Sweden!

Once you’ve been accepted to a programme and your residence permit has been processed, check out our guide to living in Sweden for information on how to prepare for your stay. Your university’s international office can also offer tips and advice.

 

For Masters

The following steps outline the application process for master’s programmes at Swedish universities. Applications are processed through the central application portal Universityadmissions.se.

Please note that for some programmes, mainly within the fine arts, application procedures and deadlines may vary. Always consult the university’s official website for programme-specific application guidelines.

  1. Find your programme

The first step to applying for a master’s programme is finding the perfect one. Search programmes for the next application round under Programmes. You can also search for programmes directly at Universityadmissions.se. Programme listings are also offered directly at the websites of specific universities.

You can apply for up to four programmes per application round.

  1. Check entry requirements and deadlines

Admission to each programme is based on general entry requirements and programme-specific entry requirements. Once you’ve decided on the programmes you’d like to apply for, check both sets of guidelines to determine your eligibility:

Be sure to check relevant application dates and deadlines well in advance of the semester you’d like to start your studies. Application deadlines are usually set in mid-January for the autumn semester (August) and in mid-August for courses starting in the spring semester (January).

  1. Apply at Universityadmissions.se

Applications are made through Universityadmissions.se, a central application service where you can apply for up to four different programmes at different universities around Sweden with one application.

The application includes the following:

Students who are not citizens of the EU, EEA or Switzerland are required to pay an application fee of SEK 900 along with their application.

Visit Universityadmissions.se for full details on how to apply and to submit your application. 

  1. Wait to receive notification of acceptance

After the deadline passes, your application will undergo a selection procedure determined by the individual university and based on various criteria such as grades, results of previous courses and degree projects and other documentation the university has asked you to submit. All of these factors will influence the outcome of your application. Each individual university makes its own admissions decisions.

You will receive your admission results – called ‘Notification of Selection Results’ – on Universityadmissions.se on the date relevant for your application round.

If you’re not a citizen of the EU, EEA or Switzerland you’ll also be required to pay the first instalment of your tuition fees (often the first semester’s tuition) at this point.

  1. Apply for a residence permit

Students who are citizens of countries outside of the EU/EEA planning to study in Sweden for at least three months will need to apply for a residence permit for studies in Sweden. As the application processing time can be long, you should apply as soon as you have received your notification of admission.

See Residence permits and visas for more information on applying for a residence permit for studies in Sweden, as well as information for citizens of EU/EEA/Nordic countries and Switzerland.

  1. Come to Sweden!

Once you’ve been accepted to a programme and your residence permit has been processed, check out our guide to living in Sweden for information on how to prepare for your stay and the Study in Sweden blog to get an idea of what life as a student here is like. Your university’s international office can also offer tips and advice.

PRE-DEPARTURE INFORMATION

Preparing for your arrival in Sweden involves many pre-departure steps to ensure a smooth start at LiU. before you get on a plane to Sweden we recommend you check out this guide.

Moving to study in another country requires a lot of preparation, which at first can seem like a daunting task. The preparation checklist will help you keep track of what to do before you arrive.

·    A place to stay

Housing companies in Linköping and Norrköping use a system where you create a free account and receive one queue point for each day you are registered. The more queue points you have, the better your chances are of getting the housing of your choice. Note that students who bring their with them cannot stay in a student corridor room. 

FEE-PAYING STUDENTS AND SCHOLARSHIP HOLDERS will be offered accommodation in a student corridor room. You need to accept and pay the tuition fee by 1 June.

EU/EEA AND NON-FEE PAYING STUDENTS will need to look for accommodation on their own. Start queuing early, since it will become more difficult to find a place to live the longer you wait.

If possible, you will want to avoid arriving in Sweden without a place to stay.

·    Health insurance

Healthcare in Sweden can be very expensive if you do not have health insurance. We highly recommend that you get complimentary insurance before leaving for Sweden.

FEE-PAYING STUDENTS will be covered by FAS+ insurance during the time they are registered as students.

EU/EEA STUDENTS  need to arrange a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). If you are not eligible for EHIC, we recommend that you arrange private insurance.

·    The right to enter Sweden

FEE-PAYING STUDENTS have to apply for a residence permit by 1 June at the latest. To ensure that you obtain your permit in time, submit your application as soon as you have received the Notification of Selection Results and paid the first instalment of your tuition fees. The invoice is sent out at the beginning of May. Apply online at www.migrationsverket.se as this will make processing your application simpler. Read carefully which documents are required in your case and submit a complete application. Incomplete applications will not be processed until they have been completed and then you might miss the arrival or registration deadline. Students who will not study on campus full-time need to apply for a short-term visa instead.

EU/EEA STUDENTS with sufficient means have right of residence in Sweden and do not need to apply for a residence permit or register their stay. You can enter Sweden freely with a valid ID, such as a passport. Some countries have special rules, e.g. Switzerland.
Contact us at admitted@liu.se for more information.

·    Sufficient means

You need to have an international debit or credit card, or exchange some Swedish cash prior to your arrival, as US dollars and Euro are not accepted in Sweden. Money
exchange offices may be closed if you arrive after office hours. If possible, do not bring too much cash with you due to risk of theft during travel. The average budget for a student in Sweden is SEK 8,190 per month, as calculated by the Swedish Migration Agency.

FEE-PAYING STUDENTS must be able to show documentation that they have SEK 81,900 for the first year of studies. Additional means are required for the upkeep of family members who accompany you to Sweden. Read more on the Swedish Migration Agency's website
EU/EEA STUDENTS are not required to submit such proof but must guarantee that they have sufficient means to support themselves.

·    Bring all necessary documents

Your admission is granted on the condition that you present originals of documents used in support of your application, and their translation. Bring a valid ID, preferably a passport, where the expiry date is clearly stated. National IDs from Europe that do not have an expiry date are not accepted in Sweden. If you are married and/or have children, bring the relevant certificates. This may be necessary for your registration in Sweden.

·    Arrive in time to start your studies

Your faculty's Information Day at the beginning of the semester is a great way to get started as a new student at Linköping University. You will receive important information and handouts regarding your studies and other practical issues. After your Information Day, you are invited to attend a Welcome Fair where you will meet various on-campus
services, and get to mingle with fellow students. All master’s programmes start with a roll call. Attendance is mandatory, or you will lose your place on the programme.
The exact dates for roll call to your programme are available via your programme specific admitted information available via liu.se/admitted.

·    Know how to get to campus

For instructions on how to get to your particular campus, check the 
Planning your travel to LiU page. It is good to know that in Sweden, you cannot buy tickets for local buses and trains using cash. You need to purchase a prepaid card, a monthly card or a single ticket at the newsagent Pressbyrån, or the green Quickomat machines, often located at busier stops. 

Masters Degrees In Sweden

Master of Arts (B.A.)

533 Programms

Master of Science (B.Sc.)

444 Programms

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.)

180 Programms

Graduate Certificate

66 Programms

Bachelor Degrees In Sweden

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

533 Programms

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.)

444 Programms

Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng.)

180 Programms

Graduate Certificate

66 Programms

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