Study in NETHERLANDS

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Students

Int. Students

Listed Universities

2

Ranked Universities

2

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University of Hertfordshire

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A new type of university – innovative, enterprising and business-facing with a commitment to adding value to employers, enterprise, regional and national economies.

Why Study Here :

  • The University of Hertfordshire is one of the top 100 universities in the world under 50 years old according to the Times Higher Education 100 under 50 rankings 2015.
  • We are included in the Times Higher Education list of the 100 most international universities in the world published in January 2015.
  • The University is one of the top 20 universities in the world to study animation according to this month's 3DWorld magazine (April 2012).
  • The University's formula student team is the most successful UK team.
About Netherlands

The Netherlands is a country in northwestern Europe, (north of Belgium and to the West of Germany) is known for a flat landscape of canals, tulip fields, windmills and cycling routes. Amsterdam, the capital, is home to the Rijksmuseum, Van Gogh Museum and the house where Jewish diarist Anne Frank hid during WWII.

Canalside mansions and a trove of works from artists including Rembrandt and Vermeer remain from the city's 17th-century "Golden Age" of capitalist expansion, exploration, discovery, colonisation and involvement in slavery.

After many years of conflict The Dutch United Provinces declared their independence from Spain in 1579.  During the 17th century, the Netherlands became a leading seafaring and commercial power, with settlements and colonies around the world. After a 20-year French occupation, and the defeat of the French at the battle of Waterloo, a Kingdom of the Netherlands was formed in 1815.

In 1830, Belgium seceded and formed a separate kingdom. The Netherlands remained neutral in World War I, but suffered German invasion and occupation in World War II, which included the forced expatriation of its labour force and the Nazi extermination of the Jews, as exemplified by the horrors as exemplified in the diary of Anne Frank.

A modern, industrialized nation, the Netherlands is also a large exporter of agricultural products. The country was a founding member of NATO and the EEC (now the EU) and participated in the introduction of the euro in 1999. In October 2010, the former Netherlands Antilles was dissolved and the three smallest islands - Bonaire, Saint Eustatius, and Saba - became special municipalities in the Netherlands administrative structure. The larger islands of Saint Maarten and Curacao joined the Netherlands and Aruba as constituent countries forming the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

The culture of the Netherlands is diverse, reflecting regional differences as well as the foreign influences built up by centuries of the Dutch people's mercantile and explorative spirit. The Netherlands and its people have long played an important role as centre of cultural liberalism and tolerance. The Dutch Golden Age is popularly regarded as its zenith.

The official language of the Netherlands is Dutch, about 89% of the total population have good knowledge of English, 70% of German, 29% of French and 5% of Spanish.

The Netherlands ; DutchNederland [ˈneːdərˌlɑnt] ( listen)), often referred to as Holland, is a country located mostly in Western Europe with a population of seventeen million. Together with three island territories in the Caribbean (BonaireSint Eustatius, and Saba), it forms a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The European portion of the Netherlands consists of twelve provinces and borders Germany to the east, Belgium to the south, and the North Sea to the northwest, sharing maritime borders in the North Sea with Belgium, the United Kingdom, and Germany.[11] The five largest cities in the Netherlands are AmsterdamRotterdamThe HagueUtrecht(forming the Randstad megalopolis), and Eindhoven (leading the Brabantse Stedenrij). Amsterdam is the country's capital,[12] while The Hague holds the seat of the States GeneralCabinet, and Supreme Court.[13] The Port of Rotterdam is the largest port in Europe and the world's largest outside Asia.[14]

"Netherlands" literally means "lower countries", influenced by its low land and flat geography, with only about 50% of its land exceeding 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) above sea level.[15] Most of the areas below sea level are artificial. Since the late 16th century, large areas (polders) have been reclaimed from the sea and lakes, amounting to nearly 17% of the country's current land mass. With a population density of 414 people per km2 – 510 if water is excluded – the Netherlands is classified as a very densely populated country. Only BangladeshSouth Korea, and Taiwan have both a larger population and higher population density. Nevertheless, the Netherlands is the world's second-largest exporter of food and agricultural products, after the United States.[16][17] This is partly due to the fertility of the soil and the mild climate as well as its highly developed intensive agriculture. The Netherlands was the third country in the world to have elected representatives controlling the government's actions; it has been administered as a parliamentary democracyand a constitutional monarchy since 1848, organised as a unitary state. The Netherlands has a long history of social tolerance and is generally regarded as a liberal country, having legalised abortionprostitution, and euthanasia, while maintaining a progressive drug policy. The Netherlands abolished the death penalty in 1870 and had women's suffrageintroduced in 1917. Regarding the LGBT community, it became the world's first country to legalise same-sex marriagein 2001.

The Netherlands is a founding member of the EUEurozoneG10NATOOECD, and WTO, as well as being a part of the Schengen Area and the trilateral Benelux Union. The country is host to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and five international courts: the Permanent Court of Arbitration, the International Court of Justice, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, the International Criminal Court, and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon. The first four are situated in The Hague, as is the EU's criminal intelligence agency Europol and judicial cooperation agency Eurojust and the United Nations Detention Unit. This has led to the city being dubbed "the world's legal capital."[18] The country also ranks second highest in the world's 2016 Press Freedom Index, as published by Reporters Without Borders.[19] The Netherlands has a market-based mixed economy, ranking 17th of 177 countries according to the Index of Economic Freedom.[20] It had the thirteenth-highest per capita income in the world in 2016 according to the IMF. In 2017, the UN World Happiness Report ranked the Netherlands as the sixth-happiest country in the world, reflecting its high quality of life.[21][nb 1] The 2018 OECD Better Life Index also ranks the Netherlands first in the world for work–life balance.[23] The Netherlands has a generous welfare state that provides universal healthcare, good public education, and infrastructure, as well as a wide range of social benefits. That welfare system, combined with its strongly redistributive taxing system, makes the Netherlands one of the most egalitarian countries worldwide. It also ranks joint third highest in the Inequality-adjusted Human Development Index, along with Australia.

Netherlands Weather

The Netherlands has a temperate maritime climate influenced by the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean, with cool summers and moderate winters.

Daytime temperatures vary from 2°C-6°C in the winter and 17°C-20°C in the summer.

Since the country is small there is little variation in climate from region to region, although the marine influences are less inland.

Rainfall is distributed throughout the year with a dryer period from April to September.

Especially in fall and winter strong atlantic low-pressure systems can bring gales and uncomfortable weather. Sometimes easterly winds can cause a more continental type of weather, warm and dry in the summer, but cold and clear in the winter with temperatures sometimes far below zero. The Netherlands is a flat country and has often breezy conditions, although more in the winter than in the summer, and more among the coastal areas than inland.

Holidays and Festivals

One traditional festivity in the Netherlands is the feast of Sint Nicolaas or Sinterklaas. It is celebrated on the evening before Sinterklaas' birthday on December 5, especially in families with small children.

In the United States the original figure of Dutch Sinterklaas has merged with Father Christmas into Santa Claus. In the Netherlands, gift-bringing at Christmas has in recent decades gained some popularity too, but Sinterklaas is much more popular.

Dutch national holidays

There are two national holidays in the Netherlands: King’s Day (Koningsdag), known for its nationwide vrijmarkt ("free market"), at which many Dutch sell their secondhand items and for celebration of the national colour, and Liberation Day (Bevrijdingsdag).

Dutch public holidays

The commonly recognised public holidays in the Netherlands are the Dutch national holidays, New Year’s Day, and a few Christian holidays.

 

Jan 1

Monday

New Year's Day

National holiday

Mar 20

Tuesday

March equinox

Season

Mar 30

Friday

Good Friday

Observance

Apr 1

Sunday

Easter Day

National holiday

Apr 2

Monday

Easter Monday

National holiday

Apr 27

Friday

King's Birthday

National holiday

May 4

Friday

Remembrance Day

Observance

May 5

Saturday

Liberation Day

Observance

May 10

Thursday

Ascension Day

National holiday

May 20

Sunday

Whit Sunday

National holiday

May 21

Monday

Whit Monday

National holiday

Jun 21

Thursday

June Solstice

Season

Sep 23

Sunday

September equinox

Season

Dec 5

Wednesday

St Nicholas' Eve/Sinterklaas

Observance

Dec 6

Thursday

St Nicholas' Day

Observance

Dec 21

Friday

December Solstice

Season

Dec 24

Monday

Christmas Eve

Observance

Dec 25

Tuesday

Christmas Day

National holiday

Dec 26

Wednesday

Second Day of Christmas

National holiday

Dec 31

Monday

New Year's Eve

Observance

 

 

Other holidays and festivals

A widespread tradition is that of serving beschuit met muisjes when people come to visit a new-born baby and his mother. Beschuit is a typical Dutch type of biscuit, muisjes are sugared anise seeds.

Other traditions are often regional, such as the huge Easter Fires or celebrating the feast of Sint Maarten on the evening of November 11 when children go door to door with paper lanterns and candles, and sing songs in return for a treat. This day is celebrated in some parts of GroningenNorth Holland and the southern part of Limburg and to a lesser extent in South Hollandand Zeeland. This feast is the beginning of the dark period before Christmas and the long days of winter.

The same thing happens on January 6 with Epiphany in some areas in the South of the Netherlands. In the past self-made lanterns were used, made from a hollowed out sugar beet.

In North-BrabantLimburg and some other parts of the Netherlands people celebrate Carnaval similar to the carnival of the German Rhineland and Belgium Flanders.

Food In the NETHERLANDS
Cuisine

Dutch cuisine is characterized by its somewhat limited diversity, however, it varies greatly from region to region.

The southern regions of the Netherlands for example share dishes with Flanders and vice versa. The Southern Dutch cuisine is the only Dutch culinary region which developed an haute cuisine, as it is influenced by both German cuisine and French cuisine, and it forms the base of most traditional Dutch restaurants.

Dutch food is traditionally characterized by the high consumption of vegetables when compared to the consumption of meat. Dairy products are also eaten to great extent, Dutch cheeses are world-renowned with famous cheeses such as GoudaEdam and Leiden.

Dutch pastry is extremely rich and is eaten in great quantities.

When it comes to alcoholic beverages wine has long been absent in Dutch cuisine (but this is changing during the last decades).

Traditionally there are many brands of beer and strong alcoholic spirits such as jenever and brandewijn.

The Dutch have all sorts of pastry and cookies, many of them filled with marzipan, almond and chocolate.

A truly huge amount of different pies and cakes can be found, most notably in the southern provinces, especially the so-called Limburgish vlaai.

Places to visit
Gouda
Gouda

flickr/ben.fitzgerald

Gouda is a typical Dutch city with lots of old buildings and pretty canals, and is a popular destination for a day trip, thanks to its great rail- and highway connections. The city is famous for its cheese, its stroopwafels (syrup waffles), candles and its clay pipes. Attractions in Gouda include the beautiful 15th century town hall and the amazing glass windows in St. Janskerk. The compact city center is entirely ringed by canals.

Rotterdam
Rotterdam

flickr/rick ligthelm

Rotterdam is the Netherlands most modern city today.

It is very bike friendly like Amsterdam, Rotterdam boasts several historic districts for visitors to explore.

The popular Delfshaven district is where the pilgrims launched sail from in 1620, and the summertime festivals and carnivals there attract visitors from nearby European countries every year.

Erasmus Bridge is highly unique and imposing, but highly regarded as a work of art, as it soars over Europe’s largest harbor. By far, the most popular visitor stop is at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, where artworks on display span from the Middle Ages to modern times, including masterpieces by Dali, Van Gogh, Bosch, and Rembrandt.

Groningen
Groningen

flickr/The Wolf

This culturally diverse university city is small but boasts two colleges, making it the main place to visit in the northern part of the Netherlands.

Museum lovers never tire in Groningen, as the Groninger Museum is one of the most innovative and modern in all of Holland, and there is additionally a graphical museum, comics museum, maritime museum, and a university museum.

Music and theater abound in Groningen, and many street cafes feature live entertainment. Because of its high student population, nightlife hotspots are a huge attraction, with The Grote Markt, the Peperstraat, and the Vismarkt being the most popular.

Haarlem
Haarlem

flickr/Bogdan Migulski

The center of the tulip bulb-growing district, Haarlem is unofficially dubbed Bloemenstad, which means ‘flower city’ and is naturally the home of the Annual Bloemencorso Parade.

This quiet bedroom community lies along the shoreline of the Spaarne River and boasts numerous intact medieval structures around town.

Visitors enjoy shopping and perusing the stunning architecture and museums along the Grote Markt city center. Popular museums in Haarlem include the oldest museum in the country, the Teylers Museum, which specializes in natural history, art, and science exhibits.

Art aficionados find themselves drawn to the Franz Hals Museum where many Dutch masters’ works rest.

Utrecht

The rich Middle Age history of Utrecht is very apparent in the city’s architecture, with its most unique feature being the inner canal wharf system that was created to stave off parts of the Rhine River from invading the city center.

Utrecht’s has the largest college in Holland, the University of Utrecht. Another notable visitor attraction in Utrecht includes the awe-striking Gothic Cathedral of Saint Martin, a 200-year structural feat that began in 1254. Architecture and museum enthusiasts should not miss the Dom Tower, the Rietveld Schroder House, and the Museum Speelklok, which boasts a vast collection of striking clocks, music boxes, and self-playing musical instruments.

Maastricht 

Best known for its dynamic city square, the Vrijthof, Maastricht in southern Holland is home to the impressive Saint Servatius Church, the Saint Jan’s Cathedral, and the old fortifications, or Vestigingswerkens, are huge draws for visitors here.

Many annual festivals take place at the Vrijthof, with local favorites arriving in autumn and winter, and this bustling town square also boasts amazing cafes, hip bars, and interesting galleries and shops. Other popular attractions in Maastricht include the St. Pietersberg Caves and the Helpoort, the oldest surviving town gate of its kind in the Netherlands.

The Hague 

Best known for the contemporary art exhibits at the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag and the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis, The Hague is arguably one of the most extraordinary places to visit in the Netherlands.

Known as the Royal City by the Sea due to its Dutch Royalty citizens, visitors often enjoy spending time along the North Sea in the warmer months at the sea town of Scheveningen. Several notable monuments and historic districts are easily traversable in The Hague, and travellers can peruse the luxury department stores, cozy shops, and international art galleries with ease. The Binnenhof, the seat of the government of the Netherlands is also located in The Hague even though Amsterdam is the capital. Other attractions in The Hague include the miniature city, Madurodam and a 360 degree panoramic view of the Scheveningen Sea in the 19th century at Panorama Mesdag.

 Delft 

From the Renaissance style City Hall building on the Market Square to the city’s traditional Holland canals, architecture, and vibe, Delft is a progressive town that has worked diligently to restore its antiquated appearance. This unspoiled town is an ideal day trip destination or vacation destination if the busy streets of Amsterdam are undesirable for a long stay. Popular sites include The Prinsenhof, where the bullet holes still remain from the death of William of Orange. This museum tells the tale of the Eighty Years’ War and also features many intriguing artworks. Those looking for a Johannes Vermeer souvenir or print cannot miss stopping by Vermeer Centrum in Delft.

Leiden 

The picturesque city of Leiden is a great place to visit for its scenic, tree-lined canals that are marked with old windmills, wooden bridges and lush parks. A boat ride down one of these lovely canals makes for an unforgettable experience.

Attractions in Leiden include the numerous museums that range from science and natural history to museums dedicated to windmills and Egyptian antiquities. The Hortus Botanicus offers sprawling botanical gardens and the world’s oldest academical observatory.

Visitors can also admire the beautiful architecture of the 16th century Church of St. Peter and check out its association with several historic people, including the American pilgrims.

Amsterdam 

One of Europe’s most popular tourist destinations, Amsterdam is widely known for its party atmosphere, cannabis practice and the red light district. With over 1500 fabulous monumental buildings and just as many bridges, visitors to Amsterdam spend much of their time exploring the eccentricities and marvelous museums dotting the 60 miles of canals across the city. The Anne Frank House and the Rijksmuseum Museum are the most popular stops for history and art seekers, while the Prinsengracht area is one of the best places for shopping, gallery viewing, pub crawling, and checking out the unique coffee shops in Amsterdam.

What language are spoken

Dutch is the official language, however over 90% of people speak English, and there are German and French influences too, as you may expect from a truly European country.

WHY STUDY IN NETHERLANDS

Higher education in Holland is known for its high quality and its international study environment. With more than 2,100 international study programmes and courses, it has the largest offer of English-taught programmes in continental Europe.

Dutch higher education also has reasonable tuition fees.

Read more about costs and value for money

why_study

Three cycles

In 2002 Holland introduced the bachelor’s-master’s degree structure, but the distinction between the two types of education still exists. Both research universities and universities of applied sciences can award a bachelor's or a master's degree.

You first obtain a bachelor’s degree (first cycle), you can then continue to study for a master’s degree (second cycle). After completion of a master’s programme you can start a PhD degree or PDeng degree programme (third cycle).

Internship

Many students do an internship as part of their study programme

Binary system

Holland has various types of higher education institutions. The two main types are research universities and universities of applied sciences.

A third, smaller branch of higher education is provided by institutes for international education, which offer programmes designed especially for international students.

Research universities are mainly responsible for offering research-oriented programmes in an academic setting.

Universities of applied sciences offer programmes that focus on the practical application of arts and sciences. These tend to be more practice oriented than programmes offered by research universities and they prepare students for specific professions.

Other education institutions

A third, smaller branch of higher education are the institutes for international education, which offer programmes designed especially for international students.

University Colleges offer honours programmes in a small-scale inclusive learning environment with a strong international focus.

There are a few other institutions that also offer international degree programmes or short courses, usually in a specific field of study.

Tuition fees

Annual tuition fees for EU students start at approximately €1,950. For non-EU students the average tuition fee for bachelor’s programmes is between €6,000 and €15,000, for a master’s programme between €8,000 and €20,000.

Standards for institutions

The Dutch institutions offer international students a guarantee of the quality of their programmes, student recruitment, selection and counselling procedures in a Code of Conduct.

The code sets out standards for Dutch the higher education institutions in their dealings with international students. Only institutions that have signed up to the code are allowed to recruit international students.

1. Fees

For EU students, if you fear the inevitable repayment demand from the Student Loans Company, then the Netherlands is the place for you. The annual tuition fee for most undergraduate and graduate courses is only about £1,700, with the Dutch government providing loans to cover the entire amount. The interest rate is only 0.81 per cent - compared to the UK rate of up to three per cent - and you don’t make any repayments for the first two years after graduation.

2. Housing benefit

EU students on a low income are entitled to Dutch housing benefit. And because you can only claim it if you have your own front door, bathroom, and kitchen, it can actually be cheaper to rent a studio than live in a flatshare.

3. Maintenance loan

Living in the Netherlands can be somewhat pricey, with a 15-minute train journey costing as much as £5, but the Dutch government offers maintenance loans of up to £880 a month. The catch is that, to claim it, you have to work more than 56 hours per month.

4. English

According to the EU, 90 per cent of Dutch people speak English. Asking “do you speak English?” to a Dutch person is like asking “did you go to school?” Reflecting this linguistic proficiency, many undergraduate and most postgraduate courses are taught in English. And the Dutch students don’t seem to find this a problem. In fact, they’ll end up correcting your grammar.

5. Dutch efficiency

To say the Dutch are efficient is an understatement. When you register with a GP, you will be on the system within half an hour. When you register at the town hall, they will send a letter to your landlord because they know who your landlord is.

6. Flexibility

The high premium put on student-teacher interactions means seminars have only around 15 students. Emphasis is placed on practical study, with Maastricht touting its ‘problem-based learning’ method, and courses everywhere involving presentations, role-play, group work, and often internships. The flexible system sometimes allows you to start a master’s in January, and even to take a semester out to go travelling.

7. International

With around 90,000 foreign students each year, Dutch universities have a truly international atmosphere. Most have societies and welcome weeks for foreign students, and Leiden even holds a lecture to help non-Dutch speakers grasp the language. Side note: the Dutch language is impossible, so don’t even bother trying.

BENEFITS OF NETHERLANDS EDUCATION
 
AVAILABLE STUDY OPTIONS
  1. Holland has a wide variety of study programmes leading to various types of degrees.
  2. If you enrol in a higher education programme in Holland, you will obtain a bachelor’s degree after finishing the undergraduate phase, and a master’s degree after finishing the graduate phase.
  3. Research universities and universities of applied sciences award both bachelor'sand master's Institutes for International Education offer master’s programmes, but no bachelor’s programmes.
  4. If you want to continue after your master's to get a PhD degree, you have to go to a research university.

Type of institution

Degrees and duration

Research universities

Bachelor of Science (BSc): 3 years

 

Bachelor of Arts (BA): 3 years

 

Master of Science (MSc): 1-3 years

 

Master of Arts (MA): 1-3 years

 

PDEng: 2 years

 

PhD: 4 years

 

Bachelor of Laws (LLB): 3 years

 

Master of Laws (LLM): 1 year

Universities of applied sciences

Associate (Ad): 2 years

 

Bachelor (B) of [field of study]: 4 years

 

Master (M) of [field of study]: 1-4 years

 

Bachelor of Science (BSc): 4 years

 

Bachelor of Arts (BA): 4 years

 

Master of Science (MSc): 1-2 years

 

Master of Arts (MA): 1-2 years

 

Bachelor of Laws (LLB): 4 years

 

Master of Laws (LLM): 1 year

Institutes for international
education
 

Master of Science (MSc): 1-2 years

 

Master of Arts (MA): 1-2 years

 

PhD (only possible at 1 institute): duration is flexible

 

 

 

Name

est.

City

Organisation

Type

Number of staff

Number of students

Government Supported Universities (by type)

1.    University of Amsterdam[1]

1632

Amsterdam

Public

University

4,062

32,739

 

Academic Medical Center

 

Amsterdam

 

Amsterdam University College

 

Amsterdam

   

2.    VU University Amsterdam

1880

Amsterdam

Special: Christian

University

2,200

18,000

 

VU University Medical Center

 

Amsterdam

 

Amsterdam University College

 

Amsterdam

3.    University of Groningen

1614

Groningen

Public

University

5,000

26,500

 

University Medical Center Groningen

1797

Groningen

4.    Leiden University

1575

Leiden

Public

University

3,973

19,328

 

Leiden University Medical Center

 

Leiden

5.    Maastricht University

1976

Maastricht

Public

University

3,000

11,463

 

Academic Hospital Maastricht

1974

Maastricht

 

University College Maastricht

2002

Maastricht

6.    Radboud University Nijmegen

1923

Nijmegen

Special: Catholic

University

4,309*

17,650*

 

University Medical Center St Radboud

 

Nijmegen

7.    Erasmus University Rotterdam

1913

Rotterdam

Public

University

3,700

26,212[2]

 

Erasmus MC

1950

Rotterdam

3,361

 

Erasmus University College

2013

Rotterdam

270

8.    Tilburg University

1927

Tilburg

Special: Catholic

University

1,062*

11,399*

 

University College Tilburg

2008

Tilburg

 

TIAS School for Business and Society

1982

Tilburg

       

9.    Utrecht University

1636

Utrecht

Public

University

8,224

26,787

 

University Medical Center Utrecht

1999

Utrecht

 

University College Utrecht

1998

Utrecht

 

University College Roosevelt

2004

Middelburg

10.  Delft University of Technology

1842

Delft

Public

University of Technology

2,633‡

13,383‡

11.  Eindhoven University of Technology

1956

Eindhoven

Public

University of Technology

2,200

7,100

12.  University of Twente

1961

Enschede

Public

University of Technology and Social Sciences

3,000

8,500

13.  Wageningen University and Research Centre

2000

Wageningen

   

6,500##

 
 

Wageningen University

1918

Wageningen

Public

University for life sciences

10,380

 

Agricultural Research Institutes

 

throughout the Netherlands

Research Institute

   

Privately Funded Universities (accredited as Universiteit by Dutch law) (by type)

Nyenrode Business Universiteit

1946

Breukelen

Private

University for Business Studies

   

Kampen Theological University

1854

Kampen

Private

University for Protestant Theology

   

Kampen Theological University of the Reformed Churches (Liberated)

1944

Kampen

Private

University for Protestant Theology

   

University of Humanistic Studies

1989

Utrecht

Private

University of Humanistic Studies

   
                 

 

 

Study options include;

Language courses

Foundation courses

Undergraduate courses

Postgraduate courses

Doctoral programmes

EXPLORE THE NETHERLANDS
 
LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT

http://www.uva.nl/en/education/bachelor-s/how-to-apply/dutch-taught-programmes/prior-education-non-dutch/dutch-language-requirements/dutch-language-requirements.html

http://www.uva.nl/en/education/bachelor-s/how-to-apply/dutch-taught-programmes/prior-education-non-dutch/english-language-requirements/english-language-requirements.html

 

Applicants are required to meet minimum English language proficiency requirements for direct entry into academic programs.

English language proficiency test

In Dutch-taught degree programmes, much of the literature and some of the lectures may be in English. All prospective students must therefore be proficient in English and must take an English language proficiency test, unless otherwise exempted from this requirement.

Exemptions

  1. Those who have completed their prior education in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, United Kingdom, United States of America.
  2. Those who have completed their prior education in a country of the European Economic Area (EEA), or in Switzerland.

You may also receive an exemption from the English language proficiency test with a diploma from a country where English is the official language of instruction, or with one of the following diplomas:

  • International Baccalaureate: English A (SL/HL), or at least English B (SL/HL), provided that English was the language of instruction
  • Aruba: VWO diploma
  • Israel: Te’údat Bagrut with at least four study units for English;
  • Morroco: Licence diploma in English;
  • Netherlands Antilles: VWO diploma;
  • Suriname: VWO diploma. 
     

Students taking the IELTS test should have a minimum score of 6.5. 

HOW TO APPLY

Applications for most programs are via the university web site.

General

Applications are competitive, there is no guarantee of a place. 

Conditions of rent allowance in the Netherlands:

You (or your fiscal partner) must be:

  • 18 or over
  • Renting independent accommodation, with signed agreement with a landlord
  • Certain that your income is not too high
  • Registered to the rented property
  • Living in self-sufficient accommodation
  • A nationality in EU or EEA or valid residence or work permit
BOARDING SCHOOLS
 
LEARN ENGLISH
 
FOUNDATION PATHWAY
 
UNDERGRADUATE
 
POSTGRADUATE
 
PHD/DBA/RESEARCH
 
SCHOLARSHIP & FINANCIAL SUPPORT

tuition fees and other expenses for those who come to study in Holland are relatively low compared to other European countries.

For students from the EU, the annual tuition fee for a degree programme or course at a Dutch university starts from €2,006. The cost of study programmes for non-EU students may vary from €5,800 to €20,000 a year.

In addition, many Dutch universities offer grants and scholarships that can reduce or fully cover the tuition fees of study 

https://www.government.nl/latest/news/2014/07/28/5-million-for-international-scholarship-programme

Tuition fees and cost of living

Tuition fees are low and life is comparatively cheap.

Tuition fees

  • Annual tuition fees for students from an EEA country, Switzerland or Surinam start at €2,006 (for the academic year 2017/2018) and €2,060 (for the academic year 2018/2019).
  • For students with another nationality the average tuition fee for bachelor’s programmes is between €6,000 and €15,000, and for a master’s programme between €8,000 and €20,000.

Visit our Studyfinder database to check the exact amounts per course.

Cost of living

Experience has shown that students living and studying in Holland for one year spend between €800 and €1,100 a month.

As a student you can get discounts in many bars, restaurants, museums and cinemas.

Read more about daily expenses

Financing your studies

There are many sources of funding your studies.

Check scholarship options

Find other ways to finance your studies

 
MONEY & COSTS

About The United Kingdom

The United Kingdom is probably one of the most cosmopolitan countries in Europe, joining people from all over the world in one truly multicultural society. More than 400,000 international students visit the UK every year.

British universities provide a broad range of internationally-recognised study programmes, preparing students for future careers in major international companies. The United Kingdom is also home to some of the best research facilities in the world.

The UK has one of the most developed countries worldwide, with many important sectors that positively impact the country’s economy, such as aerospace, pharmacy, oil and gas production, services, tourism, and education.

The famous UK rainy weather is not a very pleasant feature, but at least, you won’t experience harsh winters or very hot summers either.

ACCOMODATION

UK weather and what to wear

The UK is often associated with rain, but this is because the weather can be unpredictable. The rain doesn't come all in one season – it can come at any time of year, and on any day. You might experience beautiful sunshine, blustering winds and drizzling rain – all in one afternoon!

But with the right clothes and the right attitude, you can enjoy the UK, whatever the weather. There’s not much better than lazing by the river in the sunshine, dancing in the mud at a music festival, or heading out for a snowball fight.

TRAVEL & TOURISM

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HEALTH & WELFARE

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using 'Content here, content here', making it look like readable English. Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for 'lorem ipsum' will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like).

FOOD COST

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using 'Content here, content here', making it look like readable English. Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for 'lorem ipsum' will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like).

https://www.government.nl/

https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl/travel-and-residence/visas-for-the-netherlands/long-stay-visa-mvv/

 

check out Dutch student visa requirements. You don't want to be caught off guard! Here are some Dutch student visa details based on your country of origin: 

 

Student Visas & Work Permits in the Netherlands

Netherlands is an increasing international study destination for many students due to the high quality of education. Visa requirements depend on whether the student is an EU/non EU citizen

EU citizens

Citizens with EU/EEA and Switzerland do not need a student visa or resident permit to enter the Netherlands. However, If the student plans to stay long term, they must register with the municipality as soon as possible after they've arrived.

RESIDENCE PERMIT

You are obliged to obtain a residence permit to study in the Netherlands if you are a citizen of a non-EU/EAA country or Switzerland and are planning to stay in the Netherlands for more than three months. It is very important to arrive to the Netherlands with the correct visa; if you arrive on a short stay visa you won’t be able to apply for a resident permit. The residence permit has to be applied for within five days on arriving to the Netherlands.
Upon successful completion of your program of higher education in the Netherlands, you may apply for a residence permit valid for five years. To do this, you must have a contract of employment.

Non EU citizens

SHORT STAY VISA

For a stay of less than three months, a visa may be required, depending on your nationality. You can find information and advice on what is required of you onnuffic.nl, or by contacting your local Dutch consulate or embassy.

LONG TERM VISA

For a stay exceeding three months, you need a provisional residence permit, (“Machtiging tot Voorlopig Verblijf”, abbreviated as “MVV”), unless you are a citizen of an EU/EEA member country, Australia, Canada, Japan, Monaco, New Zealand, the US and Switzerland. This requirement applies to citizens of all other countries. The MVV allows you to enter the Netherlands; however, you must apply for a Residence Permit on arrival.

You will be granted a provisional residence permit under following circumstances:

  • You have a valid passport
  • You have sufficient financial means
  • You are not a danger to public order or national security in the Netherlands
  • The required fees are paid
  • You have a letter or other document from the Dutch host institution stating that you are or will be enrolled as a student or that you are going to do and internship
  • For interns: you have a copy of the application for a work permit if applicable
  • For Chinese students: you have a Nuffic certificate, necessary to follow study programmes which are taught in English

The application process for an MVV could take between three to six months, so it is important to start the process in good time. You can find more information on nuffic.nl or by contacting your local Dutch consulate or embassy.

Working while studying in the Netherlands

Many students choose to work while pursuing their education in the Netherlands. Depending on their nationality, students may work for a limited amount of hours/week with a work permit from their employer.

EU/EEA/Swiss nationals are allowed to work in the Netherlands as many hours as they choose while studying. The employer does not need to provide a work permit for this. Foreign students (non EU/EEA/Swiss) with a valid residence permit are allowed to work either full-time seasonal work in June, July and August, or part-time work of no more than ten hours a week outside the summer period. The employer does need to provide a work permit, but it is an easy process, since the employer does not need to prove that there are no Dutch or EU/EAA/Swiss nationals capable of doing the job.

Bulgarian and Roman nationals are also allowed to work while studying in the Netherlands for as many hours as they like while studying. However, the employer does need to provide them with a work permit and also need to show that there are no EU/EEA/Swiss nationals capable of doing the job. Since this is a very difficult process, nationals from Bulgaria and Rumania are advised to work no more than the allowed ten hours/week outside the summer period or fulltime during the summer months of June, July and August. In doing this, the work permit is a lot easier to obtain.

EU STUDENTS
 
TYPES OF STUDENT VISA
 
WORK WHILE STUDYING IN THE NETHERLANDS
 
HOW TO APPLY
 
PRE-DEPARTURE INFORMATION
 

Masters Degrees In Netherlands

Master of Arts (B.A.)

533 Programms

Master of Science (B.Sc.)

444 Programms

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.)

180 Programms

Graduate Certificate

66 Programms

Bachelor Degrees In NETHERLANDS

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

533 Programms

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.)

444 Programms

Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng.)

180 Programms

Graduate Certificate

66 Programms

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