Study in AUSTRALIA

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University of Hertfordshire

  11 REVIEWS 26429 VIEWS

A new type of university – innovative, enterprising and business-facing with a commitment to adding value to employers, enterprise, regional and national economies.

Why Study Here :

  • The University of Hertfordshire is one of the top 100 universities in the world under 50 years old according to the Times Higher Education 100 under 50 rankings 2015.
  • We are included in the Times Higher Education list of the 100 most international universities in the world published in January 2015.
  • The University is one of the top 20 universities in the world to study animation according to this month's 3DWorld magazine (April 2012).
  • The University's formula student team is the most successful UK team.
About Australia

About Australia

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million[6] is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard.[12] Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide.

Australia Weather

The climate of Australia is significantly influenced by ocean currents, including the Indian Ocean Dipole and the El Niño–Southern Oscillation, which is correlated with periodic drought, and the seasonal tropical low-pressure system that produces cyclones in northern Australia. These factors cause rainfall to vary markedly from year to year. Much of the northern part of the country has a tropical, predominantly summer-rainfall (monsoon). The south-west corner of the country has a Mediterranean climate. The south-east ranges from oceanic (Tasmania and coastal Victoria) to humid subtropical (upper half of New South Wales), with the highlands featuring alpine and subpolar oceanic climates. The interior is arid to semi-arid.

According to the Bureau of Meteorology's 2011 Australian Climate Statement, Australia had lower than average temperatures in 2011 as a consequence of a La Niñaweather pattern; however, "the country's 10-year average continues to demonstrate the rising trend in temperatures, with 2002–2011 likely to rank in the top two warmest 10-year periods on record for Australia, at 0.52 °C (0.94 °F) above the long-term average".Furthermore, 2014 was Australia's third warmest year since national temperature observations commenced in 1910.

Water restrictions are frequently in place in many regions and cities of Australia in response to chronic shortages due to urban population increases and localised drought. Throughout much of the continent, major flooding regularly follows extended periods of drought, flushing out inland river systems, overflowing dams and inundating large inland flood plains, as occurred throughout Eastern Australia in 2010, 2011 and 2012 after the 2000s Australian drought.

Australia's carbon dioxide emissions per capita are among the highest in the world, lower than those of only a few other industrialised nations. A carbon tax was introduced in 2012 and helped to reduce Australia's emissions but was scrapped in 2014 under the Liberal Government. Since the carbon tax was repealed, emissions have again continued to rise.

Holidays and Festivals

There are a number of public holidays celebrated in Australia. During public holidays, workplaces and education providers typically close, but retail stores, entertainment facilities and restaurants may remain open, as well as essential services such as public transport, supermarkets and petrol stations. National public holidays in Australia include the following:

  • Australia Day — 26th January: This is Australia's national day, which recognises the 1788 arrival of the First Fleet, a group of ships that sailed from England to establish a colony in Australia. Festivities include citizenship ceremonies where migrants become Australian citizens, concerts and carnivals. Many Australians attend barbeques and spend time with their families, often outdoors.
  • Anzac Day — 25th April: Anzac Day recognises all those who have served Australia in times of war and conflict. It is celebrated on the day that Australian and New Zealand soldiers landed in Gallipoli, the site of a historic 1915 battle during the First World War that shaped Australia's identity as a nation. The day is celebrated with Anzac Day ceremonies that pay tribute to those who served in times of war and parade. Look out for delicious Anzac Day biscuits made of oats, coconut and sweet golden syrup.
  • New Year's Day — 1st January: Celebrations of the New Year begin on 31 December in the evening. Many people hold New Year parties or attend public festivities, including fireworks at midnight to welcome the new year.
  • Easter: Easter is a traditional Christian celebration marking the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Good Friday and Easter Monday are public holidays in Australia and are celebrated by Christians and non-Christians alike. Easter is often celebrated with religious ceremonies, the giving of Easter eggs and spending time with family, often outdoors.
  • Christmas Day — December 25th: Christmas Day is a traditional Christian celebration that marks the birth of Jesus Christ. It is celebrated by both Christians and non-Christians alike. Common ways to celebrate Christmas include decorating the home with Christmas lights and Christmas trees, giving gifts, attending religious ceremonies, holding a family feast consisting of roast meat and Christmas pudding (or sometimes a more informal Australian barbeque) and spending time with family. Because Christmas falls during the Australian summer, many Australians like to hold their celebrations outdoors.
  • Boxing Day — December 26th: Boxing Day is a traditional celebration marking the day following Christmas day. It is celebrated with a day of rest and cleaning after the festivities of Christmas day, family activities and shopping, with many retailers holding their biggest sales of the year. Individual states and cities also celebrate their own public holidays, which may include celebrations such as Labour Day, Queen's Birthday, agricultural shows and sporting events such as the Melbourne Cup.

Food In the Australia

AUSTRALIANS LAY CLAIM to wonderful food creations, some more ingenious than others, yet our attachment to our Aussie food ‘classics’ suggests that it is the simpler things that take our fancy.

Whether at a family Christmas feast at the height of a scorching Australian summer or barracking at a local footy match in the depths of winter, Australians enjoy foods that suit our laid-back lifestyle. While the origins of many of our favourite Australian ‘food groups’ (e.g. the meat pie) lie elsewhere, we’ve proudly adopted many as our own.

Here are five sweet and five savoury Australian foods that will pluck at your Aussie heartstrings to remind you of days spent around the good old Australian backyard barbecue, lounging on the beach or simply the everyday.

1. Pavlova
Pavlova

Image credit: Rob Shaw/Bauer Media

Legend has it that, inspired by the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova during her 1926 and 1929 tours of Australia, Western Australian chef Herbert Sachse of Perth’s Hotel Esplanade created a desert recipe that was as light as the ballerina herself. With its wispy meringue base, smothered in a layer of freshly whipped cream and topped with fresh fruit and tangy passionfruit pulp, it’s no wonder it has stayed firmly cemented in modern Australia’s food culture. The origins of the ‘Pav’ are, however, disputed, and New Zealand has claimed that their cookbooks have older versions of the light, summer dessert. To this day, it remains one of the great bones of contention between us and our Kiwi cousins.

2. Chiko Roll
Chiko Roll

Image credit: GillBates55/Wikimedia

Australia’s love affair with the simple Chiko roll began back in 1951, when it made its NSW debut at the Wagga Wagga Agricultural Show. Frank McEnroe – a boilermaker from Bendigo, Vic. – invented the cabbage, carrot, onion and beef stuffed snack. He originally designed the Chiko roll as take-away food at football matches; the intent being to make a snack that could be held in one hand, the other hand would of course be occupied holding a cold beer. Belying its name, the Chiko Roll contains no chicken, and was inspired by the popular and much smaller Chinese spring roll, claimed by Chinese Australians as their own.

3. Meat pie
Meat pie

Image credit: David Hahn/Bauer Media

The great Aussie meat pie, though a cultural icon, was not developed here, but it has long held pride of place in the affections of Australians both young and old. First records of the Aussie meat pie come from early colonial days, when they were sold by vendors from street-carts – most famously by the Flying Pieman whose athletic feats are the stuff of legend. Nowadays meat pies are ubiquitous, found in sports club canteens, service stations and gourmet bakeries. The meat and gravy filled, flaky pastry case has earned its place in Australian culture, and the ‘Official Great Aussie Pie Competition‘ has been a national event since 1990.

Places to visit
Place to Visit

Although it’s sometimes true that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, there are many places whose allure is simply undeniable – especially here in Australia. From hidden enclaves in the hinterland to modern metropolitan marvels, this country’s got plenty of beauty to go around. We’ve pulled together this list of destinations that are generating the most buzz online for their good looks. In no particular order, here are Australia’s 25 most awe-inspiring spots.

1. Cairns, Queensland

The city known as the Gateway to the Great Barrier Reef is just as stunning as you’d expect. Get a bird’s-eye view of a tropical rainforest canopy from the Skyrail and Scenic Railway connecting Cairns and Kuranda. Or, for unforgettable sights closer to sea level, hop aboard the Daintree River cruise, which stops at a shaded riverbank garden for lunch—how charming! In the evening, take a seat at the Salt House restaurant on Marina Point, where you’ll find not only delicious dining but also one-of-a-kind panoramic views of Cairns’ waterfront.

2. The Whitsundays, Queensland

With dense rainforests surrounded by white-sand beaches, the 74 Whitsunday Islands pepper the ocean between the Great Barrier Reef and Queensland’s northeastern coast. Explore Hamilton Island’s extraordinary fringe reefs and get up close and personal with everyone’s favourite marine creatures on a dive with Deep Water Turtle Discovery. If you want to take to the skies instead, embark on Air Whitsunday’s half-day Panorama Tour and soar above the glistening islands and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

3. Fraser Island, Queensland

Don’t think the world’s largest sand island sounds all that beautiful? Think again. Spanning more than 120 km off the eastern coast of Queensland, Fraser Island is home to loads of pretty places. Vibrant Lake McKenzie is surrounded by white-silica sand that feels like you’re walking on clouds, and the view here at dawn is worth waking up early for. Fraser Explorer Tours is also a “whale” of a time—the island is known for its humpback whale watching. Or, buckle into a ute from Fraser Dingo 4WD Hire and chart your own course from the beaches into the rainforest.

Fraser Island, Queensland
4. Noosa Heads, Queensland

This town on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast is among Australia’s most captivating regions, especially once you’re inside Noosa National Park. If you like to eat while you look at pretty sights (and who doesn’t?), take your pick from any number of culinary adventures along Noosa Food Trail. From the hinterland to the coast, this foodie adventure will leave you stuffed. For a more active exploration, pedal through towering bloodwood trees and coastal she-oaks on a cycle hired from Bike On.

5. Toowoomba, Queensland

With a nickname like “Garden City”, it’s no surprise that Toowoomba is chockers with fascinating flora. What’s so impressive about gardens, you ask? The Japanese Gardens here have 230 species of trees and plants, and will turn any skeptic into a “budding” florist. Don’t miss the manicured grounds of Queens Park, then keep the theme going with a meal at Gip’s Restaurant, where you can dine in a garden that’s in a historic building. That’s a two-for-one deal.

Toowoomba, Queensland
What language are spoken

Although Australia has no official language, English has always been entrenched as the de facto national language. Australian English is a major variety of the language with a distinctive accent and lexicon,] and differs slightly from other varieties of English in grammar and spelling. General Australian serves as the standard dialect. According to the 2016 census, English is the only language spoken in the home for close to 72.7% of the population. The next most common languages spoken at home are Mandarin (2.5%), Arabic (1.4%), Cantonese(1.2%), Vietnamese (1.2%) and Italian (1.2%).] A considerable proportion of first- and second-generation migrants are bilingual.

Over 250 Indigenous Australian languages are thought to have existed at the time of first European contact,] of which fewer than twenty are still in daily use by all age groups. About 110 others are spoken exclusively by older people. At the time of the 2006 census, 52,000 Indigenous Australians, representing 12% of the Indigenous population, reported that they spoke an Indigenous language at home. Australia has a sign language known as Auslan, which is the main language of about 5,500 deaf people.

WHY STUDY IN AUSTRALIA

Did you know Australia has the third highest number of international students in the world behind only the United Kingdom and the United States despite having a population of only 23 million? This isn’t surprising when you consider Australia has seven of the top 100 universities in the world! In fact, with over 22,000 courses across 1,100 institutions, Australia sits above the likes of Germany, the Netherlands and Japan, ranking eighth in the Universitas 2012 U21 Ranking of National Higher Education Systems.

These are strong academic credentials, but our institutions are just as highly rated as the cities that house them around the country. Australia has five of the 30 best cities in the world for students based on student mix, affordability, quality of life, and employer activity – all important elements for students when choosing the best study destination. And with more than A$200 million provided by the Australian Government each year in international scholarships, we’re making it easier for you to come and experience the difference an Australian education can make to your future career opportunities.

Do you have a specific study area of interest? There is every chance Australia has you covered, with at least one Australian university in the top 50 worldwide across the study areas of Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Life & Agricultural Sciences, Clinical Medicine & Pharmacy, and Physics.

Given this impressive education pedigree, it’s not surprising there are now more than 2.5 million former international students who have gone on to make a difference after studying in Australia. Some of these students are among the world’s finest minds. In fact, Australia has produced 15 Nobel prize laureates and every day over 1 billion people around the world rely on Australian discoveries and innovations – including penicillin, IVF, ultrasound, Wi-Fi, the Bionic Ear, cervical cancer vaccine and Black Box Flight Recorders – to make their lives, and the lives of others, better.

Why wouldn’t you want to study with some of the best minds in the world?

BENEFITS OF AUSTRALIA EDUCATION
1. Recognition

The Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) is a national policy that ensures there is a uniform and recognised progression for study. The framework was introduced in 1995 and includes secondary school, higher education, and vocational education and training (VET) courses.

The AQF establishes pathways between qualifications and sets the standard for learning outcomes at each level, so not matter what you study, you can be sure you will gain formal recognition.

2. Quality

The Education Services for Overseas Students Act was introduced in 2000 and is designed to protect standards for international students studying in Australia. This piece of legislation, amended in 2010, delivers regulatory requirements for education and training institutions through the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS).

In a 2012 survey co-conducted by the Australian Government and top education groups, 86 per cent of international students responded that they were ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ with their experiences studying in Australia.

3. World-class research

For a country with a relatively small population, Australia has a history of punching above its weight when it comes to producing outstanding research. Many Australian discoveries and developments have led to tangible benefits around the world. This comes as a result of heavy investment in research, including over AU$140 million to be spent on Federation Fellowships over the next five years.

High profile discoveries to come out of Australia include penicillin, WiFi, the bionic ear, the ultrasound machine and the flight data recorder (black box).

4. Foundation studies

There’s no need to worry if you’re looking to study in Australia and you don’t meet the academic requirements. Many institutions will offer foundation studies – one-year preparatory courses designed to provide the skills and qualifications needed to continue higher education in Australia.

Completing foundation studies gives students the equivalent of an Australian high school graduation (year 12). While courses are taught in English, they often include English tutoring where required and are focused on preparing students for university study.

5. Student visa perks

Most student visas will permit you to work up to 40 hours per fortnight while your course is in session, and unlimited hours during course breaks. Not only can you work to help cover your costs while studying in Australia but you can gain contacts and spend some of your earnings checking out some of the great destinations the country has to offer.

Australia is a large country and it boasts a number of natural wonders, 17 of which are classified as UNESCO World Heritage sites. These destinations include the Great Barrier Reef, Kakadu National Park, Lord Howe Island Group, the Tasmanian Wilderness, Fraser Island and the Sydney Opera House.

6. Accommodation

Australia welcomes students from all over the world and offers a range of living options to suit all kinds of needs. Depending on the length of your stay, where you’re studying and your personal preference, you can choose between short-term accommodation, rental properties, on campus accommodation and homestays.

You can also feel secure in the knowledge that you are legally protected by the Australian government’s fair trading agency wherever you choose to live.

Regardless of what level of study you are looking at, or whether you want to experience regional Australia or one of its capital cities, there is an international study option that’s just right for you.

AVAILABLE STUDY OPTIONS

What can I study?

Study area

What is it

Secondary education

Australia is a popular secondary school destination due to the quality and international recognition of the education offered, and the safe, caring and multicultural environment. An Australian secondary school education will provide you with skills for your future study, employment and life, in Australia or anywhere in the world.

English language courses 

Australia is proud of the reputation and quality of its English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students (ELICOS) courses. The National English Language Teaching Accreditation Scheme (NEAS) works to maintain the high standard of Australia's ELICOS courses.

Vocational Education and Training (VET) 

Thousands of courses are offered through the VET sector in Australia. Qualifications gained through the VET sector can lead to a career in a variety of diverse and exciting industries.

Technical and Further Education (TAFE) 

The TAFE sector is the largest education and training sector in Australia. It offers an extensive range of courses that cover a wide range of subject areas and provide practical skills and training for a huge variety of career possibilities.

Foundation courses 

Foundation courses help international students to gain entry to undergraduate study at Australian universities. Some promise a place at university if you are successful in completing the course. They also help newcomers adapt to the Australian academic environment and way of life.

Higher education - undergraduate 

Australia is a popular destination with students wishing to complete their higher education overseas. Many students choose Australia as their destination for university study, and Australia is fast becoming one of the most popular study destinations. This is not surprising when you consider Australia’s reputation for innovative, high-quality and internationally recognised courses, and the fact that many courses are comparatively cheaper than in other countries.

Higher education - postgraduate 

Australia has built a strong reputation for excellence and quality across its higher education and training programs. This global reputation is reflected in the ever-increasing number of international students who choose to broaden their minds and enrich their lives by pursuing postgraduate courses in Australia.

MBA and management education 

Business and management students in Australia learn in an environment uniquely placed between eastern and western cultures and economies. They develop a cultural understanding that is quickly becoming an important element of business success in the era of globalisation.

Study abroad and student exchange 

Each year, thousands of international students choose to study in Australia because of the excellent reputation of its education system and courses, and for the great lifestyle and travel opportunities.

Online/distance education 

Advances in information technology have led to the expansion of distance education opportunities in Australia. A wide selection of Australian qualifications can now be completed from the convenience of home.

 

EXPLORE THE AUSTRALIA

Did you know Australia has the third highest number of international students in the world behind only the United Kingdom and the United States despite having a population of only 24 million? This isn’t surprising when you consider Australia has seven of the top 100 universities in the world! With over 22,000 courses across 1,100 institutions, Australia ranks tenth in the Universitas 2018 U21 Ranking of National Higher Education Systems.

These are strong academic credentials, but our institutions are just as highly rated as the cities that house them around the country. Australia has five of the 30 best cities in the world for students based on student mix, affordability, quality of life, and employer activity – all important elements for students when choosing the best study destination. And with more than A$200 million provided by the Australian Government each year in international scholarships, we’re making it easier for you to come and experience the difference an Australian education can make to your future career opportunities.

Do you have a specific study area of interest? There is every chance Australia has you covered, with at least one Australian university in the top 50 worldwide across the study areas of Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Life & Agricultural Sciences, Clinical Medicine & Pharmacy and Physics.

Given this impressive education pedigree, it’s not surprising there are now more than 2.5 million former international students who have gone on to make a difference after studying in Australia. Some of these students are among the world’s finest minds. In fact, Australia has produced 15 Nobel prize laureates and every day over 1 billion people around the world rely on Australian discoveries and innovations - including penicillin, IVF, ultrasound, Wi-Fi, the Bionic Ear, cervical cancer vaccine and Black Box Flight Recorders - to make their lives, and the lives of others, better.

Why wouldn’t you want to study with some of the best minds in the world?

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT

Although Australia has no official language, English has always been entrenched as the de facto national language. Australian English is a major variety of the language with a distinctive accent and lexicon, and differs slightly from other varieties of English in grammar and spelling. General Australian serves as the standard dialect.

According to the 2016 census, English is the only language spoken in the home for close to 72.7% of the population. The next most common languages spoken at home are Mandarin (2.5%), Arabic (1.4%), Cantonese(1.2%), Vietnamese (1.2%) and Italian (1.2%). A considerable proportion of first- and second-generation migrants are bilingual.

Over 250 Indigenous Australian languages are thought to have existed at the time of first European contact,] of which fewer than twenty are still in daily use by all age groups. About 110 others are spoken exclusively by older people. At the time of the 2006 census, 52,000 Indigenous Australians, representing 12% of the Indigenous population, reported that they spoke an Indigenous language at home. Australia has a sign language known as Auslan, which is the main language of about 5,500 deaf people

HOW TO APPLY

To study in Australia you'll need to apply for both admission to an institution and also for a student visa from the Australian Government.

There are a number of steps you must go through including:

  • Deciding on your preferred course and institution.
  • Submitting your application to the institution.
  • Receiving and accepting a Letter of Offer.
  • Receiving your electronic Confirmation of Enrolment (eCoE).
  • Applying for your student visa.

There is a range of entry requirements that you will need to meet both for you institution application and your visa application. This can include:

  • Academic requirements.
  • English language requirements.
  • Evidence of funds to support your study.
  • Overseas student health cover.

If you're already living or working in Australia, you may still be able to apply to study here as an international student.

Appointed Education Agents

Education agents in your home country can also help you with applying to study in Australia. It is a requirement under the ESOS Act, that all institutions maintain a list of their appointed agents and for that list to be published on their website. Please visit the institution's website at which you intend to study to view a list of their agents near you.

BOARDING SCHOOLS

School education in Australia includes preschool, preparatory (or kindergarten), primary school, secondary school (or high school) and senior secondary school (or college).

Schooling lasts for 13 years, from preparatory to senior secondary. School is compulsory until at least the age of 16. Types of schools include government schools, non-government schools (including faith-based schools such as Catholic or Islamic schools) and schools based on educational philosophies such as Montessori and Steiner. All schools must be registered with the state or territory education department and are subject to government requirements in terms of infrastructure and teacher registration.

Australian schools do more than just educate students. They prepare them for life − developing communication skills, self-discipline and respect for themselves, their peers and their world. Schools offer a broad curriculum in the key learning areas – English, mathematics, studies of society and the environment, science, arts, Languages Other Than English (LOTE), technology, health and physical education. They also believe strongly in the benefits of a rounded education – including the teamwork, self-expression and personal development that happen outside the classroom.

In Australia, students will enjoy a diverse learning environment that is as personally enriching as it is educational, and develop the skills and qualities needed in a changing world.

A higher standard of learning

Australian schools are among the finest in the world. See for yourself what makes an Australian education so valuable:

  • Small class sizes (a maximum of 30 students in a class).
  • University-trained and qualified teachers and specialist teachers in subject areas.
  • Facilities of a high standard – including a high level of technology, with all schools having computers and internet access.
  • 'Gifted and talented’ programs to extend students who are high achievers.
  • ‘High Achievement’ programs, which see the top students studying university-level subjects for advance credit.
  • Individual learning programs for students who require additional learning support.
  • Quality assurance frameworks where schools must meet required standards.

Producing thought leaders

The Australian school curriculum prepares you for your future. Our schools aim to develop students into independent and successful learners, confident and creative individuals, and active and informed citizens – with the view to giving them all the skills, knowledge and capabilities to thrive in a globalised world. From Kindergarten to Year 12, Australian schools focus on providing equity for every student, and striving for excellence in all areas of education.

Teaching styles and assessment methods

A variety of teaching methods are used, including: teacher-directed learning, student research, group projects and presentations, visual presentations, e-learning and interactive classrooms. A variety of assessment methods are used to assess student outcomes. These may include individual research projects, group assignments, oral and visual presentations, the use of technology including PowerPoint, podcast or vodcast presentations, as well as the more traditional class tests and assignments. National and state testing programs ensure standards are met and maintained.

School qualifications

After completion of senior secondary school (Years 11 and 12) students sit for exams and receive an official certificate of qualification. The name of this certificate varies within Australia's state-based education systems but regardless of what the certificate is called, it is recognised by all Australian universities, higher education and vocational education and training institutions, as well as many institutions internationally.

LEARN ENGLISH

Studying English in Australia is about much more than reciting words in a classroom. Our teaching approach focuses on critical thinking, as well as group and project work – all drawn from real-life experiences, which means you will not only be learning the language, you will be learning how to use it in everyday life.

By studying English in Australia, you will gain a huge range of life skills you cannot get at home. Invaluable skills like problem-solving, leading diverse teams of people, and applying your English to real-world situations – abilities you will draw on for the rest of your life. With a multicultural mix of students in our educational facilities, you will learn the world’s language in a truly international environment.

Our English language teaching maintains a consistently high quality – no matter where you study or what course you choose. As the only country in the world with mandatory national standards and a comprehensive, industry-led quality support framework (see English Australia) you can be confident that you’re getting the very finest English education.

Types of English training

Australia offers a range of English courses to suit a range of study needs.

General English

  • Your Goal- To improve general proficiency to access higher level courses; to improve your English for everyday use; to improve your English for travel; to improve your English for work purposes or to do casual work in an English speaking country
  • Course description- Focusing on communication skills with emphasis on speaking and listening

English for Academic Purposes

  • Your Goal- You want to study in an Australian school, vocational college or university
  • Course description- Preparing you for study at an English-speaking university, higher education or vocational institute

English for Specific Purposes (ESP)

  • Your Goal- You want to learn the spoken and written English needed for a specific context and perhaps want to consider an internship
  • Course description- Focusing on practical English for specific course areas such as business, aviation or tourism

Examination Preparation

  • Your Goal- You plan to take an exam such as IELTS, TOEFL, TOEIC, or the Cambridge First Certificate
  • Course description- Preparing you for English language proficiency examinations

English for Teaching

  • Your Goal- You want to teach English in schools in your own country
  • Course description- These courses include TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, EfTC (English for Teaching Children.)

Study Tours

  • Your Goal- You want to have a short holiday, study English and have fun or study English and undertake work related training
  • Course description- These courses are a combination of General English with sporting, social, tourist, cultural or professional training activities.
FOUNDATION PATHWAY
  • There’s no need to worry if you’re looking to study in Australia and you don’t meet the academic requirements. Many institutions will offer foundation studies – one-year preparatory courses designed to provide the skills and qualifications needed to continue higher education in Australia.
  • Completing foundation studies gives students the equivalent of an Australian high school graduation (year 12). While courses are taught in English, they often include English tutoring where required and are focused on preparing students for university study.
UNDERGRADUATE

Who offers undergraduate courses?

Australia has built a strong reputation for excellence and quality across its higher education and training programs. The large numbers of international students who want to pursue higher education in Australia reflect this global reputation.

Higher education courses are offered by universities, private colleges and some TAFE institutes. Some professional courses — such as medicine, veterinary science, law and architecture — are only offered by universities. You can use the Institution Search to search for and contact universities and higher education providers.

Courses and qualifications

Australia has a national set of qualifications that are endorsed by the Australian Government. This means that there is national and international recognition of each qualification and the level of education it represents.

The main types of undergraduate qualifications offered by most higher education institutions are as follows:

  • Bachelor degree: Bachelor degrees provide initial preparation for professional careers and postgraduate study and involve a minimum of three years of full-time study (some institutions offer a fast-track system, which allows students to complete a three-year degree in two years). Entry typically requires completion of an Australian secondary school certificate of education (Year 12) or the overseas equivalent, or a diploma or advanced diploma from the Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector.
     
  • Bachelor degree (honours): Honours may require an optional additional year of study (usually research based) following a three-year degree or may be awarded for academic achievement in degrees of four or more years.

Average tuition costs

The average cost of a bachelor degree is AUD$15,000 to $33,000.

These figures were sourced from the Australian Government’s Study in Australia website in 2015. Please note that fees vary widely and should always be sourced from the relevant institutions. Some courses, such as medicine and veterinary science, may attract higher costs.

Entry requirements

Entry into most higher education courses in Australia is highly competitive. In addition to the academic requirements specified for each qualification level (see above), applicants must also meet high-level English language requirements. Some higher education courses have additional entry requirements, such as prior knowledge in certain subjects; work experience; or the successful completion of an audition, portfolio, test or interview. Each education provider will have different entry requirements, so it’s important to contact individual providers to check.

Starting dates vary widely depending on the course. Higher education courses generally run from late February to mid-November. The academic year is typically divided into two semesters, although some institutions operate on a trimester system or offer summer schools from December to February, which can reduce the total course length. Students enrol for their courses at the beginning of the year (usually in January or February), but application dates are typically towards the end of the previous year. Some institutions also have a mid-year intake (usually in July) for certain courses.

POSTGRADUATE

Who offers postgraduate courses?

Australia has built a strong reputation for excellence and quality across its higher education and training programs. This global reputation is reflected in the large number of international students who choose to broaden their minds and enrich their lives by pursuing higher education courses here. Many international students elect to complete their postgraduate studies in Australia.

Courses and qualifications

Australia has a national set of qualifications that are endorsed by the Australian Government. This means that there is national and international recognition of each qualification and the level of education it represents.

Postgraduate courses are offered by universities and private colleges. Some fields are only offered by universities, such as medicine and architecture. Entry into most higher education courses in Australia is highly competitive, and a high standard of English language is required for postgraduate study. Each education provider will have different entrance requirements, so it’s important to contact individual providers to check. You can use the Institution Search to search for and contact individual higher education providers.

The main types of postgraduate qualifications offered by most higher education institutions are:

Graduate certificate/diploma: These qualifications are generally designed for specific vocational purposes — either the broadening of skills and knowledge already gained in an undergraduate program or the development of vocational skills and knowledge in a new professional area. The typical requirement is six months to a year of full-time study for the graduate certificate and one to two years of full-time study for the graduate diploma. Entry usually requires a bachelor degree or advanced diploma.

Masters degree: Masters degrees provide a mastery or high-order overview of a field of study or area of professional practice. They typically involve one to two years of full-time study. The masters degree may be offered in three formats:

  • Masters degree (coursework): These consist of coursework, project work and research in varying combinations. Entry typically requires prior completion of a bachelor degree, a bachelor degree (honours) or a graduate certificate or diploma.
     
  • Masters degree (research): These are at least two-thirds research and include a substantial thesis or research project, which is often externally assessed. Entry normally requires a bachelor degree (honours) or masters preliminary year.
     
  • Masters degree (extended): These may consist of a work-based project. Entry requires a relevant qualification and professional experience, or extensive relevant professional experience.

Doctoral degree: Doctoral degrees recognise a considerable original contribution to a given field in the form of new knowledge or the adaptation, application and interpretation of existing knowledge. They are usually completed over three or four years of full-time study. The doctoral degree may be offered in two formats:

  • Research doctorate (PhD): These consist mainly of supervised research resulting in the completion of a thesis. Entry requires a masters degree by research or a bachelor degree (honours).
     
  • Professional doctorate: These combine coursework and research for professionals wanting to advance their knowledge in their field without the research commitment of a PhD. Entry typically requires a masters degree by research or a bachelor degree (honours). In addition, considerable professional experience is required either before or during the course.

Average tuition costs

  • Masters degree: AUD$20,000 to $37,000 per year
  • Doctoral degree: AUD$14,000 to $37,000 per year

These figures were sourced from the Australian Government’s Study in Australia website in 2015. Please note that fees vary widely and should always be sourced from the relevant institution. Some courses, such as medicine and veterinary science, may attract higher costs.

Entry requirements

Entry into most higher education courses in Australia is highly competitive. In addition to the academic requirements specified for each qualification level (see above), applicants must also meet high-level English language requirements. Some higher education courses have additional entry requirements, such as prior knowledge in certain subjects; work experience; or the successful completion of an audition, portfolio, test or interview. Each education provider will have different entry requirements, so it’s important to contact individual providers to check.

Starting dates vary widely depending on the course. Higher education courses generally run from late February to mid-November. The academic year is typically divided into two semesters, although some institutions operate on a trimester system or offer summer schools from December to February, which can reduce the total course length. Students enrol for their courses at the beginning of the year (usually in January or February), but application dates are typically towards the end of the previous year. Some institutions also have a mid-year intake (usually in July) for certain courses.

Students studying towards a doctoral degree or other research degree may be able to negotiate an alternative starting date with their project supervisor.

PHD/DBA/RESEARCH

PhD opportunities in Australia - what's on offer for 2018?

There's more to postgraduate research than surfing, hiking and great food (sadly). You'll need to know that you're completing your doctorate at an excellent university, with the chance to conduct worthwhile research and earn an internationally respected degree.

Australia ticks all of those boxes, with universities carrying out pioneering work in ecology, renewable energy, antibiotic therapy and more. So, whether you want to study marsupials or medicine, Australia is a place where your PhD could really make a difference. And you can still go surfing too.

Here are a few other reasons to consider an Australian PhD right now:

  • Internationally renowned research- Australia is home to some of the world's leading universities, with six institutions in the global top 100.
  • Unique PhD opportunities- From Marine Biology at the Great Barrier Reef to Anthropology at Ayers Rock, some doctoral research can only be completed in Australia.
  • Generous post-study visas- Australia values its PhD graduates: your doctorate could allow you to live and work in the country for at least four years.
  • No viva- Not keen on the thought of defending your thesis during an oral exam? It's quite common for Australian doctorates to be assessed without the traditional PhD viva voce.

 

PhD Study in Australia - Key Details

Universities

43

Nobel Prizes

12

Oldest University

University of Sydney (1850)

International Students

335,512

PhD Length

3 years

Typical Fees

AUD $14,000-37,000 (USD $11,000-29,000)

Academic Year

February to November

Australian universities

There are 43 universities in Australia. All of them are publically-funded institutions, supported and accredited by the Australian Government. These institutions are also responsible for carrying out research and training PhD students - like you.

Other higher education institutions in Australia are usually Technical and Further Education (TAFE)institutions, focussing on practical and professional training. They offer some postgraduate qualifications at or around Masters-level, but don't award PhDs.

University groups

As in other countries, Australian higher education includes several university associations or 'mission groups'. These bring together similar institutions with shared aims and objectives.

They include:

Don't get too caught up with a university's affiliation when considering PhD opportunities.

A doctorate from a Group of Eight member is an impressive and prestigious qualification, but institutions in other groups offer equally excellent research opportunities in their areas of expertise. Don't forget, after all, that specialism is what PhD study is all about.

Australian university rankings

The strength - and breadth - of Australian research has traditionally been reflected in global league tables. 2018 is no exception, with eight universities in the top 150 according to the latest Times Higher Education and QS World University Rankings.

 

Top Australian Universities in 2018

University

THE 2018

QS 2018

ARWU 2017

University of Melbourne

32

=41

39

Australian National University

48

20

97

University of Sydney

61

50

83

University of Queensland

65

=47

55

Monash University

=80

60

78

University of New South Wales

85

45

101-150

University of Western Australia

=111

=93

370

University of Adelaide

=134

=109

101-150

Information in this table is based on the latest Times Higher Education World University RankingsQS World University Rankings and Academic Ranking of World Universities. Visit their websites for more information.

 

SCHOLARSHIP & FINANCIAL SUPPORT

There are many scholarships, grants, and bursaries which can help support you financially with your studies in Australia. They are offered by the Australian Government, education institutions, and a number of other public and private organisations. You can use the search tool available on every page of this site to find scholarships, along with contact details for the institution providing the scholarship.

All applications and enquiries for scholarships are made through the scholarship provider.

Here is information about some of the major scholarships programs available for international students:

  • Australia Awards- The Australia Awards aim to promote knowledge, education links, and enduring ties between Australia and our neighbours through Australia's extensive scholarship programs. The program brings together scholarships offered by the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFAT), the Department of Education and the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR). Read more about Australia Awards(opens in a new window)and Endeavour Scholarships and Fellowships(opens in a new window).
  • Australian Government Research Training Program (RTP)- From 1 January 2017 the Research Training Program (RTP) replaced the International Postgraduate Research Scholarships (IPRS) program. Find out more about the Research Training Program at the Department of Education(opens in a new window) Applications for these scholarships are made directly to a participating university(opens in a new window).
  • Australia APEC Women in Research Fellowship- The Australia APEC Women in Research Fellowships are open to high-achieving female researchers from APEC economies for research opportunities in partnership with Australian education and research institutions. The fellowships aim to support women’s economic empowerment in the APEC region and raise the profile of female role models in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Read more about the Australia APEC Women in Research Fellowship(opens in a new window).

Who can apply for a scholarship?

All  scholarships listed on our website are available to international students. Many are available to students of all nationalities, however all scholarships conditions are set by the institution or organisation offering the scholarship and applications have to be done directly with the scholarship provider. To find out if you are eligible to receive a scholarship you must contact the organisation offering the scholarship. 

MONEY & COSTS

It can be hard to imagine what life will be like in a new country, and even harder to predict everything you might need to organise or take along for your stay.

If you're not sure of something, or need an explanation, don't be afraid to ask. Most Australians will be happy to help you if you're unsure of something.

Browse through the links below to help you plan for your stay in Australia. 

ACCOMODATION

Australia has a large range of accommodation options available to international students. With choices ranging from university accommodation or homestay to self-catered apartments or share houses, there's an option to suit every personality and budget.

 

Help with finding accommodation

Many Australian education providers have accommodation services that offer information and advice about the different accommodation options and help students find appropriate accommodation to suit their needs. This service may also be able to arrange temporary accommodation for students when they first arrive in Australia. Students can contact their institution's accommodation service before their arrival in Australia to arrange this.

 

To find out more about accommodation at UNSW, visit www.rc.unsw.edu.au.

 

Availability and cost

The cost and availability of accommodation in Australia depends on the type you choose. For instance, on-campus accommodation is very popular and requires students to apply for a room well in advance, whereas rental accommodation tends to be more readily available and can often be organised when you arrive. You will also find that costs and availability vary between states and territories, as well as between metropolitan and regional areas.

 

Prior to your arrival in Australia, it is important to contact your education institution's accommodation service and ask about what is available and the costs involved.

Types of accommodation

Types of accomodation

Description

Boarding school

Many private secondary schools offer students fully catered boarding options, meaning that meals, cleaning and laundry services are provided. Boarding costs may also cover academic tutoring and social activities after school, with most schools providing a supportive family atmosphere. Depending on the school, there may be shared or private rooms. Tuition fees are charged in addition to the boarding fees. On average, boarding school accommodation fees are around AUD$11,000 to $22,000 per year.

Homestay*

Homestay accommodation gives international students the option of living with an Australian family in their home. Single or shared rooms may be available, and costs vary according to the type of room (usually around AUD$235 to $325 per week). Meals are usually included in the cost, although self-catered homestay is also available. This type of accommodation is popular with secondary students and those studying short-term English courses. Most accommodation services at Australian institutions keep a register of approved and reputable homestay providers.

University accomodation

The prices and accommodation options at residential colleges, halls of residence and apartments vary between institutions, so you should contact the institution you're interested in for full details. These options are very popular, so it's a good idea to apply early. On average, on-campus accommodation costs around AUD$90 to $280 per week.

Residential colleges

Residential colleges provide accommodation, meals, cleaning and a wide range of support services for social and academic needs. They are generally more expensive than halls of residence because of the range of facilities and support services offered. Most offer private rooms, with shared bathrooms, dining halls and recreation areas.

Halls of residence

Halls of residence also offer accommodation and a lively social atmosphere, but with fewer facilities and services included. Some meals and cleaning services may be included, but self-catering facilities are provided, enabling students to be more independent. Most offer private rooms, with shared bathrooms, kitchens and recreation areas.

Apartments

Some institutions also offer apartments for rent either close to or on campus. This provides students with the security of institution-approved accommodation, but with the increased freedom of fully self-catered living. Single and shared apartments are usually available. Apartments are popular with students in the later years of their degrees.

Hostels and guesthouses

Many students use hostels and guesthouses as temporary accommodation. Most offer private rooms, with shared kitchen and bathroom facilities. Residents cook for themselves. This type of accommodation tends to be cheaper than on-campus accommodation (at around AUD$90 to $150 per week) and still provides good opportunities for social interaction.

Private rental

Many students choose to rent a property by themselves or share the cost of a rental property with housemates. You may move into an existing household or set up a household with some friends. Rental properties are rarely furnished, so you will generally have to provide some or all of your own furniture. Rental agreements usually require payment of rent in advance, as well as a security payment called a bonde (usually one month's rent) that is paid up-front. You will also need to pay bills for electricity, gas and water. Your institution's accommodation service can help with finding rental accommodation and provide information about your rights and obligations. Rental properties or rooms are advertised on student noticeboards, websites (such as realestate.com.au and domain.com.au) and in newspapers. On average, rental accommodation costs around AUD $165 to $440 per week and shared rental accommodation costs around AUD $85 to $215 per week.

 

Cost estimates were sourced from the Australian Government's Study in Australia website in 2016.* If you are interested in becoming a homestay provider and hosting an international student in your home, contact the housing service of your nearest education provider and they will give you details on how to participate. Homestay providers can be single people or families (with or without children) from all different cultural backgrounds. The benefits of hosting an international student are numerous; at the very least, you should look forward to learning first hand about a different culture and making some lifelong friends!

TRAVEL & TOURISM

Australia’s public transport system includes trains, buses, trams and ferries. There are also taxi services in all cities and major towns. The types of transport available vary between cities. Your education provider will be able to give you details of local public transport when you arrive.

Place to Visit

While larger capital cities typically offer a number of transport options, transport is generally more limited in regional areas, often consisting of a local bus service. Check with your institution to see whether you qualify for student travel concessions.

Each state and territory has a public transport website:

For longer distances within Australia there are trains, buses and four major domestic airlines:

There are also various small regional airlines for travel to regional or remote areas.

International students may drive in Australia on a valid overseas drivers licence, which you must carry with you when you are driving. If your licence is not printed in English, you must also carry either an English translation or an International Driving Permit (IDP).

Remember that Australians drive on the left-hand-side of the road. There are different driving regulations in each state and territory, so it’s important to familiarise yourself with the road rules. Your education provider will be able to direct you to the necessary organisations

HEALTH & WELFARE

Australia is generally a very safe and welcoming place to live and study, consistently ranking among the safest countries in the world(opens in a new window).

But it is still important to look after yourself and be aware of the risks that exist - and ways to minimise them. This is particularly important for when you first arrive and are adjusting to your new way of life.

Following your common sense and best practices will ensure you remain safe and healthy, whether you are handling emergencies, personal and home safety, or natural elements such as sun, water, and fire.

FOOD COST

Basic lunchtime menu (including a drink) in the business district          AU$17

Combo meal in fast food restaurant (Big Mac Meal or similar)  AU$11

500 gr (1 lb.) of boneless chicken breast   AU$6

1 liter (1 qt.) of whole fat milk         AU$1.32

12 eggs, large            AU$5.79

1 kg (2 lb.) of tomatoes        AU$5.00

500 gr (16 oz.) of local cheese        AU$9

1 kg (2 lb.) of apples AU$4.23

1 kg (2 lb.) of potatoes         AU$3.34

0.5 l (16 oz) domestic beer in the supermarket    AU$5.25

1 bottle of red table wine, good quality     AU$20

2 liters of Coca-Cola  AU$3.28

Bread for 2 people for 1 day           AU$2.25

EU Students/International Students in Australia

How many international students are studying in Australia?

EU Students/International Students in Australia

Australia is a popular study destination with students from around the world wishing to gain a top-quality education. Each year, many new international students enrol in Australian courses and add to the already significant international student body around the country.

In 2015, 645,185 international students were enrolled in education programs in Australia. Of these, there were 272,095 international students enrolled in the higher education sector.

Which education sectors are international students studying in?

Most of the international students in Australia are studying in the higher education sector, followed by the Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector, the English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students (ELICOS) sector and the schools sector (see table below).

Data shows that ELICOS continues to provide a popular pathway for international students moving into the VET and higher education sectors. In 2015, 30 per cent of international students who commenced a higher education course had previously studied in the ELICOS sector, while 37 per cent of international students who commenced a VET course in 2015 did so through an ELICOS pathway.

 

Foundation courses are also increasing in popularity, with enrolment numbers rising by 18 per cent each year since 2012 to sit at 17,044 students in 2015.

 

Sector

International student
enrolments 2015

Higher education

272,095

VET

169,700

ELICOS

145,298

Schools

20,596

Non-award

37,496

Total in Australia

645,185

Which states and territories are international students studying in?

New South Wales and Victoria attract the largest numbers of international students. The other states and territories have smaller numbers of international students and smaller numbers of students overall.

State/territory

International student
enrolments 2015

NSW

243,206

VIC

195,804

QLD

103,251

WA

50,484

SA

32,089

ACT

12,830

TAS

5,269

NT

2,160

Where are Australia's international students from?

The following table shows the international student enrolments for the top 10 nationalities in 2015, which made up 67 per cent of Australia’s enrolments in all sectors. The largest number of enrolments in the higher education sector were from China, India and Malaysia; the largest in the VET sector were from India, the Republic of Korea and China; the largest in the ELICOS sector were from China, Brazil and Thailand; and the largest in the schools sector were from China, Vietnam and the Republic of Korea.

 

Nationality

International student
enrolments 2015

China

170,212

India

72,504

Vietnam

29,575

Republic of Korea

28,725

Thailand

27,965

Brazil

24,672

Malaysia

24,123

Nepal

19,807

Indonesia

19,300

Pakistan

16,091

All nationalities

645,185

The information in this article was sourced from the Australian Government’s Department of Education and Training 2015 international student enrolment data.

TYPES OF STUDENT VISA
Types of Australia Student Visa

There are 8 types of Australia student visa. A student can opt for one of these visas depending on his or her circumstances. The student visa categories are listed below:

  1. Independent ELICOS Sector visa (subclass 570): This visa is meant for those international students who want to stay in Australia to study a full-time English Language Intensive Course for Overseas Students (ELICOS). If a student has to undertake ELICOS as a prerequisite to another course, the student must apply under the subclass relevant to the principal course.
  1. Schools Sector visa (subclass 571): This visa is meant for those international students who want to stay in Australia to study a full-time school course. The course of study may be a primary school course, a secondary school course, including junior and senior secondary, or an approved secondary school exchange program.
  1. Vocational Education and Training Sector visa (subclass 572):This visa is meant for those international students who want to stay in Australia to study a full-time vocational education and training course, including Certificate I, II, III, and IV, Diploma or Advanced Diploma.
  2. Higher Education Sector visa (subclass 573): This visa is meant for those international students who want to stay in Australia to study a full-time higher education course, such as, a bachelor degree, graduate certificate or graduate diploma.
  3. Postgraduate Research Sector visa (subclass 574): This visa is meant for those international students who want to stay in Australia to do postgraduate research i.e., a Doctoral degree.
  4. Non Award Sector visa (subclass 575): This visa is meant for those international students who want to stay in Australia to study either a non-award foundation studies course or another full-time course (or components of a course) that does not lead to an Australian award in Australia.
  5. Foreign Affairs or Defence Sector visa (subclass 576):This visa is meant for those international students who are sponsored by AusAID or Defence to study a full-time course of any type in Australia.
  6. Student Guardian visa (subclass 580): This visa is meant for those international students who want to stay in Australia:
  • as the guardian of an international student younger than 18 years of age studying in Australia on a student visa
  • in exceptional circumstances, as the guardian of an international student over 18 years of age studying in Australia on a student visa

Note – In this article we will provide information about Higher Education Sector visa (subclass 573) for Australia.

WORK WHILE STUDYING IN THE AUSTRALIA

One of the many advantages of studying in Australia is that international students are able to work part time while completing their studies to support themselves financially.

Your employment rights in Australia

Your student visa enables you to work up to 40 hours per fortnight during semester, which allows you to earn an income to cover your living expenses while still leaving plenty of time for your studies. During semester breaks you are allowed to work unlimited hours.

To make the employment process as easy as possible, you should open an Australian bank account so that your employer can deposit your earnings. You should also apply for a Tax File Number (TFN) from the Australian Taxation Office to ensure that you are not taxed at a high rate (your employer will provide you with a TFN declaration or you can obtain one online or by phoning 13 28 61).

It is important that you are aware of your employment rights. You should be paid a fair wage for any work you do, so beware of employers who insist on paying you ‘cash in hand’ or those who ask you to complete unpaid work on a ‘trial’ basis. You should also be familiar with the pay and conditions for your area of employment — known as an ‘award’ — and carefully read any employment contracts you sign. See the Fair Work Ombudsman website for details.

Where you can find work

This all depends on your own personal strengths and interests. The main thing is to find a job that is convenient for you — one that is located on or near your campus or in your local area. Popular part-time jobs for students include the following:

  • Retail — any kind of store that sells goods to customers, from clothing to electronics. It could be a small store, a chain of stores or a large department store.
  • Hospitality — employers include cinemas, restaurants, bars, hotels, takeaway food stores and sporting venues.
  • Services — employers include supermarkets, petrol stations, call centres and various businesses requiring administration work.
  • Industry — if you are lucky, you might be able to gain employment that is related to the field you are studying (for example, a media student might be able to work part time assisting at a local television or radio station).

How you can find work

Before you start searching and applying for jobs, you need a résumé.  Many institutions have a careers service that will be able to assist you with writing and formatting a professional résumé that lists your education, skills, interests and previous employment experience. It is important that your résumé is free of errors, so you might want to ask someone who is a strong English speaker to check it before you start searching for jobs.

Once you have a résumé it’s time to search for a job!

  • You can go to a local shopping centre or shopping strip and hand your résumé into stores. Ask the manager whether they have any positions available — if they don’t you can ask to leave your résumé with them to keep in mind for future vacancies. It is important that you wear nice clothes to make a good first impression.
  • You can search the ‘careers’ section on employer or industry websites to find vacancies. Many of these websites will allow you to apply online.
  • You can use an Australian job search website to search for part-time jobs in your area. The main job-search websites are SeekMyCareer, CareerOne and ApplyDirect
  • Your institution might also have a careers service that can put you in touch with employers or have a job search page on their website that lists available part-time jobs.

Useful links

HOW TO APPLY

Before you apply

Australia is a great place to study. It provides high-quality courses, a fantastic lifestyle and a welcoming environment for international students. Once you have been accepted into your Australian course, the next step is to organise your student visa.

Before you apply for an Australian course, you should contact the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) or your nearest Australian visa office to find out whether you will be eligible for a student visa, how to make your application and what documents are required. 

 

General and evidentiary student visa requirements

There are various general and evidentiary requirements that international students must meet in order to be eligible for a student visa. These include requirements relating to:

  • your health
  • your character
  • Overseas Student Health Cover (OHSC)
  • being free of debts to the Commonwealth of Australia
  • custody, accommodation and general welfare arrangements for students under 18 years of age
  • your capacity to cover the cost of air fares, course tuition fees and living costs for you and your family members for the duration of your stay in Australia (the minimum living cost requirement is AUD$19,830 per year)
  • your academic record and qualifications completed
  • your English language proficiency
  • proving that you are a genuine temporary entrant.

Applying for a student visa

You need a Confirmation of Enrolment (CoE) from your education provider to apply for your student visa. Letters of offer are no longer accepted, even at the application stage. Applications are typically lodged online, although you may be able to apply by post or in person at your designated Australian visa office. The amount of evidence you are required to provide with your application will depend on your country of origin and intended education provider. You can use the document checklist tool on the DIBP website for an indication of the evidence you will need to submit.

 

The best way to find out your specific visa requirements is to visit the DIBP website. You can also contact an education agent, your nearest Australian visa office or the international office at your intended Australian institution for advice and help with your visa application.

 

 

Course packaging

Students can apply for two or more courses on the same student visa when there is clear progression from one course to the next. The final course a student undertakes is classified as their main (or principal) course of study and is used to determine evidentiary requirements.

 

Fees and charges

A non-refundable base application charge of AUD$550 applies to most visa applications. Applicants who are bringing eligible family members to live with them in Australia while they study should note that an additional applicant charge applies for each additional family member included in a combined visa application. This charge is added to the base application charge and varies according to the age of the additional applicant(s). In addition, there may be other expenses associated with your visa application, such as costs for medical examinations, police checks and the translation of documents into English (if required). For more information, see the Fees and Charges section of the DIBP website.

Student Guardian Visas

If you are the parent or legal guardian of a child under 18 who is moving to Australia to study, you can also apply for permission to live in Australia as a student guardian on a Student Guardian Visa. Student guardians can live in Australia for the duration of their child's course or until the child turns 18. There may also be exceptional circumstances where a student over 18 years of age may need a guardian for religious or cultural reasons.

In order to be eligible, parents or legal guardians must meet the general and evidentiary requirements listed above relating to health, character and financial status. In addition, the applicant must:

  • be a parent, person who has legal custody, or a relative of the student for whom you will be guardian
  • be at least 21 years of age
  • be able to provide accommodation, general welfare and other support to the student.

The Department of Immigration and Border Protection can provide more details about eligibility and the application process. Visit the Student Guardians section of their website for more information.

Help with your visa requirements

The best way to find out your specific visa requirements is to visit the DIBP website or your nearest Australian visa office. You can also contact an education agent or the international office at your intended Australian education provider for advice and help with your visa application.

PRE-DEPARTURE INFORMATION
Plan your departure

Add to study guide

Once you have been accepted to study at an institution and have received confirmation of your student visa, the next step is to start planning for your arrival.

Here is a checklist to help you plan your departure:

  • Passport and Visa– Check that your passport is valid for at least 6 months prior to your entry arrival in Australia, and that you have all your visa documentation. It is also a good idea to make copies of your passport in case you lose your passport.
  • Student enrolment and orientation documents– You will need your electronic Confirmation of Enrolment (eCoE) and student information pack, which you will have received from your institution.
  • Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC)– This is a requirement for entry to Australia, so make sure you have your health cover policy arranged before you leave home.
  • Travel Insurance– You should also consider travel insurance, which covers things your OSHC may not – such as cancelled flights, lost documents, dental or optical care, etc.
  • Airfares– Make sure you are aware of the date and time of your flight. Keep your flight details in a safe and secure place, with your passport and visa.
  • Contact details– You may want to have a list of emergency contact details for family, as well as your embassy, accommodation and institution details. If you have used an education agent, keep their contact details on you, in case you need to contact them once you arrive in Australia.
  • Australian currency– There are money exchange places available at Australian airports and in cities, but it is recommended to have some Australian currency on you prior to leaving your home country.
  • Transport from the airport– Whether you are taking public transport, a taxi, or you are being picked up from the airport by your education provider, it is important that you have all the details including the time, the route and, if your travel has been arranged by your institution, their contact details. If you need a map to assist you in getting to your accommodation from the airport, they will be available at the airport, or you can print one prior to leaving.
  • Accommodation details– Make sure you have the address of where you will be staying as well as their phone number and payment confirmation (if you have already paid for your accommodation).
Customs and Border Protection

You need to be aware of what you cannot bring into Australia(opens in a new window) and therefore what you should not pack. It is illegal to carry drugs including marijuana, cannabis, heroin, cocaine and amphetamines in and out of Australia. There are a number of items that you must declare upon your arrival in Australia including:

  • Firearms, weapons and ammunition.
  • Currency amounts of A$10,000 (or foreign equivalent).
  • Some medicines.

You should also be aware that as a routine part of their work, Customs and Border Protection officers may question travellers at any time, and trained dogs may also be used to detect illegal drugs or prohibited imports. If you are in doubt, declare your goods or ask a Customs and Border Protection officer for advice. Declaring goods does not necessarily mean your baggage will be examined.

People who deliberately break Australian Customs and Border Protection regulations could be fined(opens in a new window) or taken to court. You can also find information at the Department of Home Affairs(opens in a new window) website.

Department of Agriculture and Water Resources

The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources is responsible for protecting Australia’s unique environment and agricultural industries from unwanted pests and diseases by regulating imported products including certain food, plant material and animal items.

It is important to check Australia’s biosecurity requirements when packing your personal items. Do not bring fresh fruit and vegetables, meat, poultry, pork, eggs, dairy products, live plants or seeds. Some products are not allowed into the country while other products need to meet strict import conditions. You can search the department’s Biosecurity Import Conditions system (BICON)(opens in a new window) to find detailed import conditions under which various commodities may be brought into Australia.

If you are unsure of an item, declare it on the Incoming Passenger Card which you will receive on the plane, or don’t bring it at all. Failure to declare items can result in an on-the-spot fine or potential prosecution.

You can find more information on what you can bring or send to Australia on the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources website(opens in a new window).

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